Posts Tagged ‘project’

How to Transfer Your Photos Onto Wax Candles

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Here’s an idea for a fun weekend project and/or personalized gift: make some custom candles that feature your photographs. It’s actually incredibly easy, and you may already have the necessary materials lying around at home.
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The Photographic Dictionary Defines Words with User Submitted Images

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The Photographic Dictionary is a project dedicated to defining English words “through the literal, figurative, and personal meanings found in each photograph.” Each word and definition in the dictionary is accompanied by a photographer-submitted image that illustrates it in some way.
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Too Hard to Keep: A Collection of Photographs People Couldn’t Bear to Live With

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Photographs help us remember important moments in our lives, but what happens when they capture things we’d rather forget? Sometimes photos are so painful that their owners can’t bear to live with them, and that’s the premise behind photographer Jason Lazarus‘ project THTK, short for “Too Hard to Keep”. Since 2010, Lazarus has been collecting photos that people deem “too painful to live with any longer.”
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Portraits of People Who Have Been Shot and Scarred by Gun Violence

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Since 2013, photographer Kathy Shorr has been shooting portraits of subjects who have been shot by guns — the victims and survivors of gun violence from around the United States. The ongoing project is titled “SHOT” and now contains over 50 portraits.
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How Ricoh Returned 90,000 Photos to Victims of the 2011 Tsunami in Japan

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When Japan was devastated by the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami in 2011, countless families lost precious photos in their homes that washed away. In response, many organizations sprung up to recover, restore, and reunite photos with their owners.

One company that launched a huge initiative was Ricoh. In the four years following the disaster, the company’s “Save the Memory” project found and cleaned 418,721 photos, returning 90,128 pictures to the people who lost them.
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A Selfie a Day Keeps the Doctor Away: Creative Studio Self-Portraits by Mike Mellia

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Mike Mellia is an advertising and fine art photographer based in New York City. Over the past year, he has been working on a project titled “A Selfie a Day Keeps the Doctor Away.” It’s an ongoing series of self-portraits captured in a studio and shared through Instagram.

Mellia poses as a wide range of fictional personas and includes clever and humorous captions to go along with each image. He says the photo above shows “that one time an affluent divorcee invited me to clean her pool.”
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Portraits of Rescued Dogs and the Tattooed Owners Who Saved Them

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Since 2012, photographer Brian Batista has been shooting an ongoing project titled Tattoos & Rescues. It’s a series of portraits that seeks to combat the negative stereotypes surrounding both rescue dogs and tattooed people. The photos are meant to show that looks can be deceiving, and you should get to know both dogs and people before judging them based on outward appearances.
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Selfie Bots: Students Create Robot Snappers That Use Sight and Sound

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Cornell offers a course on designing with microcontrollers, and this year’s final project submissions featured a couple of groups who decided to build robotic photographers that help capture selfies.
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Photographer Imagines What Chairs Would Look Like If They Were People

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“What would chairs look like if they were people?” It’s a strange question that forms the basis of an interesting and creative project by photographer Horia Manolache. It consists of pairs of photos showing various chairs and Manolache’s ideas of what those chairs would look like in human form.
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The Tower of David: Photographs Showing Life Inside the Tallest Slum in the World

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The Tower of David in the Venezuelan capital city of Caracas is an unfinished skyscraper and the third tallest building in the country. The construction of the tower came to an abrupt halt in 1994 due to the Venezuelan banking crisis, and it was quickly taken over by squatters. Thus, for years the building was known as the “tallest slum in the world.”

24-year-old photographer Alejandro Cegarra spent time with the residents and documented their way of life through images. The resulting project is titled, “The Other Side of the Tower.”
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