Posts Tagged ‘private’

Here, Look: An iOS App for Creating Quick, Disposable Photo Albums to Show Friends

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There are those dreaded moments in everyone’s life when you hand your phone over to someone to show them a collection of images you’ve saved or captured on your phone, only to have them continue swiping well past what you intended them to, possibly wandering into dangerous territory.

This, however, could become an issue of the past thanks to a new iOS app called Here, Look. Read more…

The Legality and Ethics of Pointing a Lens Into a Private Residence for Art

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Award-winning photographer Michael Wolf is raising some eyebrows with a new photo project titled “Window Watching.” The series features photographs of high-rise apartment windows in Hong Kong, offering glimpses into the lives of people living inside the private residences. Basically, Wolf pointed a telephoto lens at open windows to photograph people going about their day-to-day-lives, without their knowledge and consent.
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Instagram, Acquisitions, and the Long-Term Ownership of Your Personal Data

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Engadget and gdgt founder Ryan Block has published an op-ed over at The New York Times on why he has decided to quit Instagram. It comes in the aftermath of Instagram’s policy hoopla, but it’s not the same argument you’ve been seeing all over the web:

As technology companies work overtime to make it easier to sign up and maintain accounts, little regard is given to the long-term ownership and use of our data. After all, it’s far easier for each of us to simply forget and neglect all the random sites and services we’ve signed up for than to keep up with the innumerable changes to opaque terms of service and privacy policy documents, or monitor every merger and acquisition of every company that makes something we use. In fact, to do so would basically be a full-time job, and an excruciatingly tedious one at that.

Block gives an example of how his account on Friendster (once a dominant social network) was eventually sold to a random company geared toward Southeast Asian youth, resulting in a flood of marketing messages. Obviously his argument applies to not only Instagram, but most photo-sharing services on the web today.

Ryan Block: Why I’m Quitting Instagram [NYTimes]


Image credit: Ryan Block – Launch Conference – San Francisco by kk+

Trick: Easily Set Photos to “Private” in iOS by Cropping Them Down

If you own an iOS device, you’ve probably noticed that the Camera Roll in the native Photos app doesn’t come with any way to mark photographs as private. For this reason, the App Store features a large number of apps (both paid and free) designed to offer that feature, allowing you to choose what to show and what not to when someone else is flipping through your photographs. If you want an easy way to “mark photos as private” without having to download a special app (or pay money for a fancy one), Amit Agarwal over at Digital Inspiration offers this simple trick: crop them.
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Is the World Ready for Wearable Cameras (Or Cyborgs)?

Professor and self-proclaimed cyborg Steve Mann created an eye and memory-aid device he calls the EyeTap Digital Glass. The EyeTap, worn by Mann above on the left, is a wearable device that is similar to Google Eye, pictured right, but he’s been making them at home since the 1980s. The goal of his project is to use images to aid memory, or even to augment the memories of people with Alzheimer’s Disease or who simply want to preserve their memories more permanently. However, a recent misunderstanding over Mann’s technology allegedly caused a confrontation between Mann and several employees at a Paris McDonald’s restaurant.
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Instagram Allegedly Downplays Security Vulnerability

Sebastian Guerrero, an independent researcher in Barcelona says he’s discovered a way to force friendship with any Instagram user — private or public — by exploiting an Instagram server-side vulnerability. In one case, Guerrerro forced Mark Zuckerberg to follow his test account. Then Guerrerro sent him a message through a photo post, which would show up in Zuckerberg’s photo feed of people he follows. Guerrero also used a test account to follow a private user without the required approval from the private user.
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MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Facebook Flaw Allows Access to Private Photos, Including Zuckerberg’s

A recently discovered flaw in Facebook’s abuse reporting tool allowed anyone to access private photographs of other users, including Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. Until it was fixed today, the reporting tool allowed anyone who reported a public photograph’s owner to also peruse that user’s images, both public and private. After members of a bodybuilding forum discovered the security hole, they proceeded to target Zuckerberg’s account and publish a number of his private photographs online. This comes a week after the FTC slapped Facebook’s wrist over deceptive privacy practices.

(via Wired via The Click)

Google’s Photovine is Now Live, but Still Shrouded in Mystery

If you’re not convinced that Google is jumping into the photo-sharing pool head first, get this: the company has not one, but two stealthy photo sharing apps in private beta. Besides the Pool Party app that came to light at the beginning of the month, the rumored Photovine service has now materialized into a website — well, a landing page, at least.
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Collector Quietly Building World’s Largest Private Archive of Vintage Photos

As newspapers struggle to survive in this new digital media world, an Arkansas-based collector named John Rogers has quietly built the world’s largest privately owned collection of photographs by paying huge sums of money for their photo archives. He currently has about 35 million photographs purchased from newspapers including The Chicago Sun Times, The St. Petersburg Times, and The Denver Post. Of these images, he owns or shares the copyright to about 25 million.

Part of the deal in each acquisition is that Rogers’ company digitizes and meticulously organizes the images, making the digital versions available to the newspapers. Apparently his phone is “ringing off the hook” from newspapers eager to have him purchase and digitize their archives.

Collector pays newspapers millions to digitize vintage photos (via Rob Galbraith)