Posts Tagged ‘print’

Use a Scanner to Turn Your Small Phone Photos into Giant Prints

Want to made giant prints of your tiny phone photos? Instead of doing the enlargement purely with Photoshop, Photojojo suggests using a scanner for high-quality enlarging. Simply resample the small photo at 360dpi, print it out on high quality matte paper, and then re-digitize it using a scanner at 360dpi and the print size you want. It’d be interesting to see a side-by-side comparison of this technique versus simply resizing in Photoshop and printing that image directly.

DIY: Turn Phone Photos into Mural-Sized Prints! [Photojojo]

Oldest Known Print of Iconic Cartier-Bresson Photo to Be Auctioned

Behind the Gare St. Lazare is one of French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson‘s best known photographs, and is frequently cited as an example of his “decisive moment” approach to photography. The photograph was made in 1932, but the oldest known print is dated 1946. That print will be sold at a Christie’s auction on November 11th along with 100 other signed prints, and is expected to fetch up to ~$250,000.

(via Christies via Foto Actualidad)

How to Make Your Own Canvas Print

Earlier this month we shared a hugely popular post on transferring a photo onto a block of wood. Well, the same technique can also be used to create a canvas print. All you need, besides the stretched canvas, is some gel medium and a photo printed with toner (e.g. made with a laser printer or photocopier). The gel medium is used to “steal” the toner from the paper, and once the paper is rubbed away, the print remains. Check out the full tutorial over on A Beautiful Mess.

Make Your Own Canvas Portrait! [A Beautiful Mess]


P.S. Be sure to check out the wood transfer tutorial if you haven’t seen it already. It’d make for a neat gift for the holidays!

Print Your Photos Using an Old 1800s Salt Printing Technique

If printing your film photos with the usual chemicals isn’t old school enough for your taste, you should try your hand at making a salt print. Photographer Andrew B. Myers made the above print using the technique, and explains,

Salt printing is one of the oldest processes photography has employed, pioneered by Henry Fox Talbot back in 1839. The process hasn’t changed much since then. Basically, you start by coating paper in a solution of water and sodium chloride (I ended up using table salt) and letting it dry. Next, in a darkroom environment, a silver nitrate solution is applied to the salted paper, creating a light sensitive emulsion. Let it dry. At this point, a contact print can be made by sandwiching a film negative or some sort of transparency and letting the paper sit in the sun. In my case, I had access to a powerful UV light with a timer, which worked in a similar fashion, and allowed me to work at night in the winter. It’s quite neat seeing the image once it’s been exposed, and after washing and fixing, you’re done. [#]

You can find a more in-depth tutorial over at Dulce Photography, or browse some more sample salt prints in this Flickr group.

(via Photojojo)


Image credit: Photograph by Andrew B. Myers and used with permission

How to Shoot, Print, and Frame a Massive Photo on a Budget

Want to adorn a wall with a giant print using your own photography? Here’s a great video in which photographer Lee Morris shares how he shot, printed, and framed a massive 5-foot-wide panoramic print for less than $150 — super cheap compared to the $1,000+ you might pay to have it professionally done. After shooting multiple photos on a bridge in Rome, he merged the images using Photoshop, had a metallic print made by Bay Photo Labs, and then framed it using a large mirror he found at Bed Bath and Beyond. The final result is quite impressive!


Disclosure: Bay Photo Labs is a sponsor of PetaPixel

PillowMob Turns Portraits into Pillows

PillowMob is a new service that transforms photos of heads into puffy pillow heads. In addition to human faces, you can also use the face of your beloved pet. They cost $25 each with free shipping — it’s currently available to US residents only, but the company may begin shipping internationally soon.


Thanks for the tip, Jeremy!

Nikon’s Curious Policy on User Manuals Has Some Customers Grumbling

Apparently Nikon has decide to save some trees (and shipping weight) by no longer including user manuals in some of its digital cameras. Since most people likely never touch the manuals anyway, it’s not really a problem, but the company’s draconian stance towards downloadable instruction manuals has some customers grumbling.
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Halftone Photos Carved into Plywood

Finish modder metalfusion has a sweet DIY way of showing off photographs. After converting .jpg, .gif, or .png photographs into halftone images using a free program, they use a CNC machine to carve the image into black-painted plywood by drilling into the wood at various depths. Up close the “print” looks like a piece of wood with a bunch of holes, but step back — or squint your eyes — and the photo can be seen!

DIY CNC (via Hacked Gadgets via Engadget)

Experiment with Random Lenses by Making Your Own Bellows

DC Watch has a tutorial on how to make your own bellows on which you can use various lenses (toy binoculars, magnifying glass, etc…). Print out the PDF template, then follow the video tutorial above to get started. Here’s a Google Translated version of the tutorial.

Bellows Lens Toy (via Nikon Rumors via Foto Actualidad)

Wall Mounted Box Prints Polaroid-style Instagr.am Photos Remotely

Instaprint is a neat wall-mounted printer that fuses old-school Polaroid-style instant photos with social media (namely Instagr.am). Basically it’s a box you rent for events that contains a modified, Internet-connected Zink printer. It uses the Instagr.am API to constantly scan for a specific location or hashtag, and when new photos are found they’re automatically printed and pushed out the bottom.
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