Posts Tagged ‘primer’

Lighting Fundamentals: High Speed Sync Versus Flash Duration

If you’re just getting started in learning how to light your shot with flashes, you may be confused about the terms “high speed sync” and “flash duration.” Here’s a helpful 6-minute primer in which photographer Daniel Norton explains what these two concepts are, how they differ, and which situations they come in handy for.
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Using a 10-Stop Neutral Density Filter for Daytime Long Exposure Photos

Photographer Josh Cripps of Professional Photography Tips made this short and sweet introductory tutorial on how you can use 10-stop neutral density filters to capture long exposure photos in bright daylight. These filters drastically reduce the amount of light hitting your lens, allowing you to blur slow-moving things in your scene (e.g. clouds or streams).
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10 Tips for Optimizing Your Photos with Lightroom: A Primer on Basic Techniques

If you’re just starting out in Adobe Lightroom and would like some guidance on how you can use the software to improve your photographs, here’s a free lesson that may be of interest to you. Photography instructor Tim Grey shares his top 10 tips for optimizing photographs in Lightroom.

The talk runs for nearly 2 hours, so you’ll need to carve a chunk out of your day to watch it, but it could be helpful for anyone in need of a primer on some basic tools.
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Video: The Technologies Inside Canon’s EF Lenses

If you’d like a primer on the technologies found inside Canon’s EF line of lenses, look no further than this 12-minute introduction created by Canon. We learn about things like aspherical lenses, fluorite lenses, diffractive optics, USM, lens coatings, and more.

Canon produced its 100 millionth EF lens back in April of 2014.

(H/T The Digital Picture)

So You Want to Shoot Film?

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I have been shooting a lot of film lately and enjoy it tremendously, so I thought I’d share some of the experiences I’ve had in the last year or so, mainly so you can learn from the mistakes I made, avoid them and then make your own.

For the sake of getting some kind of structure into this post I’ll try and describe three typical scenarios of people shooting film today, differentiated by the amount of control you’ll have over the image.
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An Introduction to Playing with Ultraviolet Fluorescence in Photographs

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Ultraviolet fluorescence is a mechanism in which UV radiation excites chemicals in an object and causes them to release visible light. There are many household objects which fluoresce, such as some washing detergents (anything that ‘makes your whites whiter), soda water (it contains a chemical called quinine which makes it taste bitter, and also causes the fluorescence), the dyes found in highlighters, the bacteria found on the face (which cause spots and acne), bodily fluids (including urine) and much more.
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A Beginner’s Primer on Post-Processing Photos in Lightroom 4

French photographer Serge Ramelli made this short 30-minute tutorial that teaches the basics of using Lightroom 4 to post-process your digital photographs. If you’re just getting into using Lightroom and shooting in RAW, it’s a helpful primer that will allow you to hit the ground running.

Ramelli has a number of other Lightroom 4 tutorial videos, as well as a YouTube channel chock-full of helpful photography tutorials.

(via Serge Ramelli via Reddit)

An Introduction to Aspect Ratios and Compositional Theory

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Here’s a primer for beginning photographers on the concepts of aspect ratios and compositional theories.
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The Simplified Guide to Getting Started in Photoshop

When photographer Devon Mikale was in high school, he created this lengthy manual for his newspaper class to help others learn how to get started in Photoshop. The high school’s faculty loved it so much that they ended up purchasing it for re-distribution in future classes. Mikale has graciously allowed us to publish the guide here for free.

It’s a lot of images and information, but if you’re just starting out and have been overwhelmed by all the different things you need to learn, this guide will walk you through the fundamentals.
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A Great Graphic for Understanding How ISO, Aperture, and Shutter Speed Work

Check out this awesome exposure triangle graphic found in this Exposure Guide tutorial on the fundamentals of exposure:

When these three elements are combined, they represent a given exposure value (EV) for a given setting. Any change in any one of the three elements will have a measurable and specific impact on how the remaining two elements react to expose the film frame or image sensor and how the image ultimately looks. For example, if you increase the f-stop, you decrease the size of the lens’ diaphragm thus reducing the amount of light hitting the image sensor, but also increasing the DOF (depth of field) in the final image. Reducing the shutter speed affects how motion is captured, in that this can cause the background or subject to become blurry. However, reducing shutter speed (keeping the shutter open longer) also increases the amount of light hitting the image sensor, so everything is brighter. Increasing the ISO, allows for shooting in lower light situations, but you increase the amount of digital noise inherent in the photo. It is impossible to make an independent change in one of the elements and not obtain an opposite effect in how the other elements affect the image, and ultimately change the EV.

If you’re just starting out in photography, do yourself a favor and work through the Photography Basics page over on Exposure Guide. It’s a fantastic resource.

Exposure – ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed Explained [Exposure Guide via Reddit]