Posts Tagged ‘power’

The FlameStower Lets You Charge Your Gear On the Go Using Fire

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Outdoor loving photographers who are often far away from power grids don’t have too many options when it comes to charging up their gear. Without a generator you’re pretty much left with batteries and solar chargers.

But the guys behind the FlameStower didn’t like either of those options, so they came up with a third. Instead of using batteries or the sun, they decided to use fire. Read more…

PocketWizard Cable for Nikon Powers PW Transmitters From the Camera

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There’s a new cable on the market that will save you having to carry around at least one set of batteries. If you’re a PocketWizard user and a Nikon owner, the company just announced a power cable that will allow their radios to pull power directly from your Nikon DSLR. Read more…

Convert Your DSLR Battery Into a Power Supply Unit That Plugs Into Outlets

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When Milan-based engineer and photographer Andrea Biffi needed a constant source of power for his Canon 40D in order to shoot time-lapse photos over many hours, he decided to save some money by going the DIY route. Biffi turned a defunct lithium DSLR battery into a power supply unit that can be used with everything from a wall outlet to a car battery.

You can do the same thing at home, but you’ll need a bit of engineering know-how to accomplish the hack.
Read more…

Photos Showing the Beauty of Japanese Limestone Mines

Japanese photographer Naoya Hatakeyama has spent the past 25 years documenting man’s interaction of nature in factories, quarries, and mines. One particular subject that he has given a great deal of time and attention to is Japanese limestone mining. His beautiful large-scale images show the destructive blasts used to break up the rocks, and the man-made landscapes left behind in their wake.
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Future Cameras May Have Lithium-Ion Batteries That Recharge in Minutes

What if the battery in your camera could be charged in the same amount of time it takes to microwave a cup of instant noodles? It sounds crazy, but that’s what appears to be headed our way.

Researchers at the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea have figured out a way to drastically cut down the time it takes to recharge a lithium-ion battery — the same kind found in most digital cameras.
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Digital Cameras Are Cheap to Charge

Ever wonder how much you’re paying to keep your rechargeable camera batteries juiced? The answer: probably around a buck or two a year. Researcher Baskar Vairmohan of EPRI conducted a study to determine the effect of popular gadgets on our nation’s power grid, calculating the annual electricity costs of various devices. He found that an iPhone uses $0.25, an iPad uses $1.36, a 60-watt light bulb uses $1.61, a laptop uses $8.31, a desktop uses $28.21, and a fridge uses $65.72. Camera batteries probably fall somewhere between an iPhone and a light bulb, meaning they’d cost less than a Starbucks coffee to power for a year — though you still need to pay for the (often pricey) batteries themselves.

(via EPRI via Boing Boing)


Image credit: Camera battery charger by sparkieblues

Tip: Bring Your Own Power Strip When Traveling Abroad

Here’s a simple tip by photographer Benjamin Von Wong for traveling abroad: you can make recharging your devices overseas a breeze by building a charging station using a single power adapter and your own power strip.

(via DYIP)

Daughter Finally Sees Mother’s Face after Photo “Retweeted” 100K+ Times

The power of the Internet is awesome when it helps reunite people with lost photos, but it’s even cooler when it uses photos to help reconnect people with relatives. That happened recently with a 71-year-old shoe shiner in China named Shufang Zhong. Zhong’s daughter had moved to a far away city five years ago, and although they could speak on the phone, her daughter desperately wanted to see her face. The problem was, Zhong had absolutely no Internet access and no idea how to reach her daughter.

On June 24th, Zhong noticed a man using an iPad and begged him to help her search online for her daughter. There wasn’t Wi-Fi in the area, so the man snapped a photograph of Zhong instead and uploaded it to Chinese microblogging service Weibo (similar to Twitter). Within just a few hours the image had attracted news organizations, celebrities, and over 100,000 “retweets”, and on June 27 the daughter came across the photo online and saw her mother’s face for the first time in five years.

(via Chengdu Daily via VentureBeat)


Update: After some further digging, it appears the story is different than how we initially reported it (and how our source reported it). We’ve updated the post accordingly. Sorry about that.

Could Future Cameras be Powered by Pressing the Shutter Button?

Researchers in Australia are working on developing a thin piezoelectric film that can be used to convert mechanical energy into electricity. An uber-useful application would be to use the film in existing gadgets, allowing button presses and finger swipes to be used to recharge the device’s battery. One of the lead scientists, Dr. Madhu Bhaskaran, states,

The power of piezoelectrics could be integrated into running shoes to charge mobile phones, enable laptops to be powered through typing or even used to convert blood pressure into a power source for pacemakers – essentially creating an everlasting battery.

Wouldn’t it be crazy if cameras of the future could be powered solely by pressing the shutter button when taking photos (and perhaps other buttons while chimping)?

(via Gizmag via Mashable)


Image credit: Shutter Button by drkshadow92

AP Takes Legal Action for the Release of bin Laden Death Photos

President Obama announced last week that photographs of Osama bin Laden’s body would not be released to the public due to concerns that it would incite violence and hatred, but a number of news agencies and advocacy groups are attempting to have them released using a Freedom of Information Act request. The Associated Press is one of the agencies that filed a FOIA request (they’re also requesting that video of the raid be released), and the US government has 20 days to respond.
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