Posts Tagged ‘pinholecamera’

Bomb Squad Called to Bridge to Deal with a Solargraphy Pinhole Camera

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Solargraphy involves using a pinhole camera to shoot extremely long exposures of scenes. Photographers who engage in it often leave their cameras fixed to outdoor locations for months or years in order to capture the path of the sun across the sky.

Waiting until the whole exposure is complete before seeing if an image turned out is painful enough, but there’s another major difficulty that can cause practitioners pain: the cameras are sometimes mistaken for bombs.
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How to Create a Homemade Large Format Pinhole Camera Using a Shoebox

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This camera is a poor man’s large format camera. It is made with a simple shoebox acting as a dark room.
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Cardboard Hasselblad Medium Format Pinhole Camera to Be Sold as a Kit

Update: The Kickstarter campaign has been cancelled due to a legal threat against Angood.


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Remember that beautiful cardboard Hasselblad created by designer Kelly Angood a couple of years ago and released as a PDF template? If you’d like to build your own but don’t want to go through the trouble of printing the design onto cardboard and cutting out the pieces, you’ll be glad to know that Angood is working on launching a do-it-yourself kit for the camera.
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Six Month Long Pinhole Exposures Made Using Beer Cans and Tape

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After taking a pinhole workshop taught by renowned pinhole photographer Justin Quinnell, UK photog Matt Bigwood was inspired to start an interesting pinhole project of his own. Thus was born the six-month long exposure you see above, taken using a pinhole camera made from a beer can, some gaffer tape, and a sheet of 5”x7” black and white photographic paper. Read more…

A Nifty Panoramic Pinhole Camera Made with LEGO Blocks

We’ve featured large format LEGO cameras before, but what about wide format? Photographer Giacomo Citti created this panoramic LEGO pinhole camera that features a sliding shutter and film winders on the sides.
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A Ceramic Pinhole Camera That Looks Like an Old School Diving Suit

Potter and pinhole camera enthusiast Steve Irvine created the awesome camera above using fired stoneware, glaze, copper, and found objects. The shape and pressure gauges make it look like an old school diving suit from 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. Yes, the camera actually works: it uses a 4×5 sheet of photo paper as film.
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Dirkon: The Vintage DIY Pinhole Camera Made of Paper

The Dirkon pinhole 35mm camera is made entirely from paper cut from a template by designers Martin Pilný, Mirek Kolář and Richard Vyškovský. The three published the template in a 1979 issue of Czechoslovakian magazine ABC mladých techniků a přírodovědců (translated as An ABC of Young Technicians and Natural Scientists). While original prints of the magazine are rare, the Dirkon gained cult popularity in Chzechoslovakia.
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Camera Obscura Images Can be Collected From Any Windowed Room

The camera obscura has been around for a long time (Middle Ages long) and typically consisted of a box or room with a hole in one side through which an image of its surroundings could be formed. As you can see from the example above, any room — in this case a bathroom — can be turned into a camera obscura given a small enough “aperture.” Unfortunately, most rooms have big, blaring windows that let in too much light, and the only image formed on the opposite wall is a shadowy blob.

In the name of forensics, however, Antonio Torralba and William Freeman from MIT have discovered a technique by which they can turn any windowed room into a camera obscura, using a couple of stills of the room to magically gather an image of the outside world. Read more…

How to Fold an Origami Pinhole Camera Out of Photographic Paper

Here’s a neat idea for photographic experimentation: create a pinhole camera out of photographic paper by folding it into an origami box with the light-sensitive side on the inside. The hole that is used to blow the box into its shape is also used to expose the inside to the outside world. After exposing it, simply unfold it and process it using standard developer and fix.

(via DIYP)

A Working Papercraft Polaroid Camera

Photographer Matthew Nicholson, the guy behind the amazing Lie-ca paper pinhole camera, is at it again. This time he’s building a working paper camera that looks just like a Polaroid One Step Rainbow camera! Branded as the Fauxlaroid Land Camera, it will apparently use actual instant film that the user “processes” manually.

(via Photojojo)


Image credit: Work in Progress – Polariod Pinhole Camera. by matt makes stuff