Posts Tagged ‘pinhole’

Turn Your Halloween Pumpkin into a Pinhole Camera

Claire O’Neill and Mito Habe-Evans over at NPR’s The Picture Show blog have just posted a fun experimental project you can try out this halloween: making a pinhole camera out of a pumpkin. What you’ll need is a pumpkin, aluminum foil, a knife, tape, photo paper, dark spray paint, and access to a dark room. Along with the disturbing skull camera we shared earlier today, this would be a fun way to capture photos of trick-or-treaters this halloween.
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Third Eye: A Human Skull Pinhole Camera

There probably isn’t a more suitable camera for halloween picture taking than “Third Eye“, a macabre pinhole camera created with a 150-year-old human skull by Wayne Martin Belger. Light enters the camera through the “third eye” on the forehead, exposing the film that’s placed in the middle of the skull.
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Wide Angle Pinhole Cap for Micro Four Thirds Bodies

The Pinwide is a new pinhole cap by Wanderlust Cameras that takes advantage of the mirrorless nature of Micro Four Thirds cameras by recessing the cap into the body of the camera, achieving a wide field of view and strong natural vignetting. The “lens” is the equivalent of a 22mm on a 35mm camera, and boasts a perfectly round pinhole “made with the same precision etching technology used to manufacture semicoductors” to ensure sharpness.
Sample photos after the break

Turn Your Panasonic Micro Four Thirds Camera into a Digital Holga

If you have a Panasonic Micro Four Thirds camera and a love for retro photos, the Skink Pinhole Pancake Pro Kit can instantly turn your camera into a digital Holga pinhole camera. It’s a modular system that provides three kinds of “holes”:

Depending on the desired effect, you can use your camera as a pinhole-, zone plate- or zones sieve camera. To a high degree the installed aperture determines how your vision is creatively interpreted in rendering an image. The traditional pinhole creates relatively sharp images with exposure times ranging from one second to several minutes. With a zone plate or zone sieve however, photos can be taken without a tripod, if the lighting conditions permit higher speeds.

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Secret Police “Pinhole” Camera Shoots Through Walls

Randomly came across this camera today on Wikipedia in the article on Stasi, the secret police of East Germany. Apparently it’s a “quiet” camera that was able to capture photographs through 1mm holes in walls. Now that’s a pinhole camera.

If you see anyone carrying this thing around, be very alarmed.


Image credits: GDR Stasi Camera by Appaloosa

Camera Body Caps as Pinhole Lenses

Did you know you can turn your DSLR into a pinhole camera by using a body cap with a tiny hole in it? Photojojo just started selling body caps converted for this purpose in their store, but if you don’t want to pay $50 for them to bust a hole in a cap for you, there’s a neat tutorial over at Photocritic teaching you how to make your own.

Pinhole Camera Photo from on a Record

This photograph results from exposing a pinhole camera while it’s spinning around on a record player. A simple yet creative idea, huh?

(via Gizmodo)


Image credit: follow the tunes.. by Tim Franco and used with permission

Likea Pinhole Camera Looks Like A Leica

Always wanted a manual Leica but couldn’t afford it? This Likea pinhole camera may not reproduce Leica-quality photos, or necessarily feel like a Leica (it’s made from card stock), but it looks like one! Though it may be more manual than you can handle: for $20, you just get the Likea MPH kit that you’ll still need to assemble. And you’ll have to make your own pinhole part out of a soda can. But after all, it’s not the camera that makes the photographer.

(via Wired)

Pinhole Camera Made From iPhone Box

There’s no app for this: Etsy seller Erin Paysse designed this pinhole camera out of an iPhone box. It’s been done before with an iPod box, but Paysse added a clean, retro touch to the camera. She’s selling the camera for $80, as well as some prints produced by the camera for $25.

Check out her store to see more creative pinhole cameras made out of  boxes and books.

(via Boing Boing)

Cameras Made from Food Containers and Floppy Disks

peekfreak is a collaborative project between industrial designer Wai Lam and experimental photographer Yann Huey in which they explore the possibility of making cameras using everyday objects. The cameras they’ve made so far use things such as discarded bike parts, plastic containers, and 3.5” floppy disks.

The cameras are extremely minimalistic, and the sliding metal cover of the floppy disk is used as a simple shutter mechanism to expose the film. Check out the innards:

Since the cameras are so randomly put together, the resulting photographs have their unique looks depending on construction:

If getting weird looks while doing photography is your thing, then these cameras are for you! They aren’t for sale and there isn’t any tutorial on how to make these, but the cameras are simple enough that you should be able to figure it out from the photographs.

peekfreak (via Gizmodo)


Image credits: Photographs by peekfreak