Posts Tagged ‘pinhole’

P.90: The Rolls Royce of Pinhole Cameras

The P.90 is a limited edition pinhole camera by Kurt Mottweiler, an Oregon-based builder of wooden cameras. It’s constructed using Cherry wood and brass, has a tripod adapter on the bottom, and is loaded with 120 roll film.
Read more…

World’s Largest Camera Big Enough to Hold an Airplane

What you see above is the inside of the world’s largest pinhole camera measuring 45x160x80 feet. It’s an abandoned airplane hangar in Irvine, California that was converted over the course of two months into a gigantic pinhole camera. 24,000 square feet of plastic, 1,300 gallons of foam filler, 1.52 miles of tape, and 40 cans of spray paint went into darkening the hangar.
Read more…

Pinhole Camera Made from a Pine Nut

Transforming foods into pinhole cameras appears to be one of the popular trends. We already shared the egg pinhole camera, and now here’s the pine nut pinhole camera. Italian photography student Francesco Capponi created this tiny camera by painting the inside of the shell black, poking a hole in one side, loading it with a piece of photographic paper, and using his thumb as a shutter. He calls it the “PinHolo”, a play on words since “pinolo” is Italian for “pine nut”.
Read more…

Eggs Transformed into Pinhole Cameras

Francesco Capponi was inspired yesterday (AKA Easter and World Pinhole Photography Day) to create pinhole cameras out of eggs. He painted the insides with emulsion to make it light-sensitive after drilling a hole, exposed it through a pinhole, then filled the egg with processing and fixing chemicals to develop the photo. You can find a full walkthrough of his process over on Lomography. The process isn’t easy — in creating four satisfactory photos Capponi ended up destroying fifty eggs!

The Pinhegg – My Journey To Build An Egg Pinhole Camera (via Make)

Giving Away Sharan Cardboard Cameras

Update: This giveaway is now over. The winner was randomly selected and announced below.


This week we’re doing a smaller giveaway just for fun, but the prize can only be shipped to addresses in the US (sorry international readers!). We’re giving away the two Sharan cardboard pinhole camera kits that we featured here a while back. The Std-35e shoots normal 35mm images and is worth $25, while the Wide-35 does panoramic photos.

To enter this giveaway, all you need to do is:

Link us to a favorite photo of yours taken in 2011

There are two ways to enter, and doing both methods will give you 2 entries in the contest, and thus double the chance the win!

  1. Leave your response as a comment on this post
  2. Tweet your response, and include the following link to this post anywhere in the tweet: http://j.mp/sharan

    As long as the link appears in the tweet, you’ll be automatically entered in the contest.

This contest will end Sunday, April 2, 2011. We’ll randomly pick a winner using random.org and update this post. Good luck!


Update: This giveaway is now over. We received 31 comment entries and 17 Tweet entries for 48 entries overall. The randomly selected winners are…

#2: John Dunahoo (STD-35e)

one of my favorite photos… Orlando, FL

#24: Michael Wilson (Wide-35)

Recent HDR photo of Goldwater Lake in Prescott, AZ

Please email [email protected] to claim your prize (we’re contacting you as well).

Thanks to everyone who entered! Please stay tuned for more awesome giveaways!


A big thanks to Brooklyn5and10 for providing the prize for this giveaway!

Build Your Own Working Cardboard Hasselblad Pinhole Camera

You can now build you own version of the cardboard Hasselblad pinhole camera that we featured a couple days ago. Kelly Angood has released a PDF with the template and detailed instructions for putting the pieces together. The finished product is a working pinhole camera that takes 120 35mm film.
Read more…

Pinhole Cameras Made with Photo Paper

Photographer Thomas Hudson Reeve shoots pinhole photographs in a pretty interesting way — rather than using photo-sensitive paper or film inside a separate camera, he creates the camera using photo paper itself. The resulting photograph is exposed onto the inside of the photo-sensitive camera (which he calls the “PaperCam”), and creates a pretty surreal look when opened up and developed.
Read more…

Cardboard Hasselblad Pinhole Camera

Designer Kelly Angood created this cardboard pinhole camera that looks exactly like a Hasselblad medium format camera. The design is screen printed onto the cardboard, and the camera accepts 120 film. See sample photographs shot with this camera over on Angood’s website.

Pinhole Hasselblad (via Make)


Update: Angood published a PDF with templates and instructions for those of you who want to make your own.

How to Turn Your DSLR into a Simple Pinhole Camera

Make just published this short but informative tutorial on how to turn your DSLR into a pinhole camera by punching a hole in a body cap. If you have a spare body cap lying around (how often do you use those things anyway?) this can be a fun way to experiment with your camera.

Simple Pinhole Camera Created with Ordinary LEGO Pieces

Flickr user Chase Lewis created this working pinhole camera using ordinary LEGO pieces (we featured an uber-fancy LEGO Mindstorm camera before) for his high school film photography course.
Read more…