Posts Tagged ‘pinhole’

Cardboard Hasselblad Pinhole Camera

Designer Kelly Angood created this cardboard pinhole camera that looks exactly like a Hasselblad medium format camera. The design is screen printed onto the cardboard, and the camera accepts 120 film. See sample photographs shot with this camera over on Angood’s website.

Pinhole Hasselblad (via Make)


Update: Angood published a PDF with templates and instructions for those of you who want to make your own.

How to Turn Your DSLR into a Simple Pinhole Camera

Make just published this short but informative tutorial on how to turn your DSLR into a pinhole camera by punching a hole in a body cap. If you have a spare body cap lying around (how often do you use those things anyway?) this can be a fun way to experiment with your camera.

Simple Pinhole Camera Created with Ordinary LEGO Pieces

Flickr user Chase Lewis created this working pinhole camera using ordinary LEGO pieces (we featured an uber-fancy LEGO Mindstorm camera before) for his high school film photography course.
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Sharan Cardboard Pinhole Camera Kits

Sharan pinhole cameras are Japanese-made cardboard camera kits that you buy and build yourself. All the parts are pre-cut, and can be assembled using tape in about 1 to 2 hours with the help of step-by-step instructions. The STD35 is a standard 35mm pinhole camera, while the Wide-35 allows you to take panoramic photos.
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Pinhole Cameras Made from Vintage Hardback Books

Erin Paysse sells one-of-a-kind pinhole cameras created by upcycling vintage hardback books. Each camera has a magnetic shutter and is designed to take standard 35mm film.

The camera comes with it’s own set of instructions on how to load, shoot, and remove film, approximate exposure times, number of turns to advance each frame, as well as sample photos taken from some of my many cameras. Each camera takes very different pictures, so get ready to experiment with this incredible camera!

Each camera costs about $200 and can be purchased through Paysse’s Etsy store.

Automated Pinhole Camera Built with Lego Mindstorms

Pinhole cameras are usually very low-tech and dumbed-down in their operation, but how would one go about making it fancier like a digital camera? Basil Shikin decided to build his own custom pinhole camera using Lego Mindstorms, adding all sorts of awesome features to an ordinarily simple kind of camera. Features include automatic shutter speed calculation using a sensor, automatic film rewind, and the tracking of how much film remains.

If you’re interested in making your own, there’s a Google Code Project page that includes “making of” instructions and download links for the firmware.

legocamera (via Engadget)

Concept Cardboard Pinhole Camera Shoots Instant Photos

The “Flutter in Pinhole” is a beautiful concept camera that combines a cardboard pinhole camera with instant film to make sharing memories a breeze, and could be the high-tech postcard of the future.
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Lo-Fi Photography with a 4-in-1 Lens

 Subjectiv Lens

If you’re a fan of lo-fi images produced by plastic or pinhole camera, you don’t have to carry around multiple cameras or lenses. The “Subjectiv” lens give you four shooting modes in one lens and is compatible with Nikon and Canon.
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Turn Your Halloween Pumpkin into a Pinhole Camera

Claire O’Neill and Mito Habe-Evans over at NPR’s The Picture Show blog have just posted a fun experimental project you can try out this halloween: making a pinhole camera out of a pumpkin. What you’ll need is a pumpkin, aluminum foil, a knife, tape, photo paper, dark spray paint, and access to a dark room. Along with the disturbing skull camera we shared earlier today, this would be a fun way to capture photos of trick-or-treaters this halloween.
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Third Eye: A Human Skull Pinhole Camera

There probably isn’t a more suitable camera for halloween picture taking than “Third Eye“, a macabre pinhole camera created with a 150-year-old human skull by Wayne Martin Belger. Light enters the camera through the “third eye” on the forehead, exposing the film that’s placed in the middle of the skull.
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