Posts Tagged ‘photoshelter’

Photographers: Finding New Clients, Not Gear, Is Biggest Challenge in 2013

2013challenges

In late 2012, Photoshelter surveyed around 5,000 photographers to find out the industries outlook on 2013. Some of the findings were pretty interesting.

The chart above shows the top challenges the photographers think they’ll face in 2013. Only 10% of those who responded were worried about gear-related issues. People don’t seem to be having a hard time finding the right equipment to use for their shoots — it’s the business-side of the photography business that’s weighing photogs down.
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National Geographic’s Senior Photo Editor On “What Photo Buyers Want”

A little over a month ago we featured an extended interview with long-time Newsweek Photo Editor Jamie Wellford. It was a longer video than we usually put up but very educational and well worth an hour of your time. And now Photoshelter has put together another long interview/webinar as part of their “What Photo Buyers Want” series, this one with National Geographic Senior Photo Editor Elizabeth Krist.

In the video, Photoshelter’s Allen Murabayashi goes in depth with Krist about the her background, NatGeo as a whole, and how the magazine goes about selecting from the many thousands of photo submissions they receive on a daily basis. If you’re into National Geographic photography and hope to maybe make a career of it some day, this is an hour of insight you won’t wanna miss.

What Photo Buyers Want: National Geographic’s Senior Photo Editor Elizabeth Krist (via The Click)

Why Instagram is Terrible for You, and Why You Should Use It

Although everyone has an opinion on Facebook’s purchase of Instagram for $1b, I think we can all agree: Instagram is terrible for photographers (Gotcha). Why? Let’s count the ways.
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How to Shoot Powerful Portraits of Powerful People

Here’s an hour-long live video interview that Photoshelter recently did with Michele Hadlow, senior photo editor over at Forbes Magazine.

Hadlow speaks on how the magazine has managed to continue commissioning high-profile shoots despite cutbacks common across most publications. Michele tells us about the top characteristics all killer portraits must have to get featured, and what photographers need to succeed with both their subjects and clients.

Michele also discusses how Forbes hires photographers, and what up-and-coming photographers can do to get noticed. Having been at the magazine for over 14 years, Michele speaks to over a decade of work in the industry

(via Photoshelter)

Rant: I Love Photography

It might sound strange to use the verb “Love” in the title of a rant. But here goes.

I love photography.

Why am I telling you this? Isn’t it self-obvious? Don’t we all love photography? The answer is no. There is a percentage of photographers who hate photography. They do not appreciate photography. They do not consume photography. They don’t look at photo books or photo magazines. They hate the guy with the iPhone taking Instagram shots. They hate the guy who just bought the D4 because they don’t have one. They hate people using digital because film is what real artists use. They hate photographers who embrace social media because images should stand on their own. They hate Getty, Corbis, the AP, day rates, photo editors, assistants, rental houses, camera stores, point-and-shoots, iPads, zoom lenses, padded camera straps, wheeled suitcases, younger photographers, older photographers. The photo of so-and-so on the cover of whatever it’s called sucks. That guy copied the other guy, he sucks. Terry Richardson sucks. Chuck Close sucks. Vincent Laforet hasn’t taken a still in 17 years. Kodak hasn’t been managed well since the 70s. Blah, blah, blah.

I love photography. Let me show you why.
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Interview with Allen Murabayashi, CEO of PhotoShelter

Allen Murabayashi is the co-founder and CEO of PhotoShelter.


PetaPixel: Can you tell us a little about yourself and your background?

Allen Murabayashi: I was born and raised in Honolulu, and had a pretty early love affair with photography. One of my childhood friends, Jon Emura, had a neighbor who had us over one weekend afternoon to show us how to use an SLR and light meter. After that, my dad let me borrow his Olympus OM-10 to take pictures.

When I was in 7th grade, my parents took a trip to Hong Kong and got me an Olympus OM-4, and I was in Heaven. I wasn’t a great photographer, but I was always taking pictures from junior high onwards.
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Behind the Scenes with the Threadless Photo Department

If you’ve ever browsed the t-shirts at Threadless, you know that the company features photography very prominently on their website. Each shirt page shows off not only the design, but a unique photo of a guy and a gal wearing that design — often in a location that reflects the artwork. Grover Sanschagrin of PhotoShelter recently paid a visit to Threadless and made this interesting behind-the-scenes video of how the photo department (AKA Sean Dorgan) there operates.

Beautiful Documentary-Style Vignette on Tattooing Shot with a Canon 1D Mk IV

A good majority of news and documentary photographers tend to shy away from capturing video footage on DSLRs, owing to the cameras limited HD clip length. However, here’s a really fantastic example of a documentary-style story shot with a 1D Mark IV, directed by photographer Austin Walsh in Kansas City.

Interestingly, Walsh and his creative team normally do advertising work, but the resulting piece has the feel of a New York Times One in 8 Million project. Walsh, who created the piece for a PhotoShelter lecture on passion projects, also produced every component of the video from scratch, including its own soundtrack. Read more…

Inspiring Webinar by Tim Mantoani

Photoshelter hosted this truly inspirational talk with photographer Tim Mantoani. It runs a bit long, but it’s definitely worth a watch. Mantoani shares about what truly motivates and inspires him in photography, as well as the experiences photography yields. Most importantly, Mantoani talks about envisioning your dream photo and how to go about capturing it.

The photographer is a cancer survivor, and his experience has influenced his approach to photography. Mantoani has also been working on a fascinating project, Behind Photographs, in which he takes portraits of iconic photographers holding prints of their work. You can view some of Mantoani’s projects and other work on his website.