Posts Tagged ‘photojournalism’

Pictures of Hope: Using Photography to Give Hope to Children in Need

picturesofhope

Photography can be a wonderful source of growth, healing and hope. Programs like this one at the VA in Palo Alto have helped PTSD-afflicted veterans cope with their condition, while the EYE AM program was trying to have children tell their stories on an international level.

EYE AM never raised the funding it needed, but another program devoted to helping children through photography has been going strong for a couple of years now, making a difference for children in need all over the United States. This program is called Pictures of Hope. Read more…

A First-Person View of What It’s Like to Photograph Protests in Egypt

Want to experience what it feels like to be a photojournalist in the midst of the violent protests and clashes that have been occurring throughout the country of Egypt? Check out the video above.

It was created by photographer Amanda Mustard, a self-taught freelance photojournalist who’s currently based in Cairo, Egypt. When an anti-Islamic video went viral online in September 2012, Mustard went onto the streets with a GoPro mounted to her DSLR to document the resulting turmoil.
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Life After Steel

In the aftermath of the Sparrows Point Steel Mill's closure in Baltimore, Maryland, 58-year-old Bobby Curran returns to college to retrain for a new profession.

Eric Kruszewski · Aug 12, 2013 · 8 Comments » ·

Billionaires Buying Papers and the Future of Photojournalism

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In the space of a few days, two major newspapers have been sold from their corporate entities to billionaires. On August 3, The New York Times Co agreed to sell The Boston Globe to John Henry, the owner of the Boston Red Sox, for a pittance of $70M. And on August 5, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos agreed to buy the Washington Post for $250M.

Earlier in the year, billionaire industrialists Charles and David Koch, investigated buying the Tribune Company, which operates the Los Angles Times and Chicago Tribune.
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Conflict Photogs Reflect on the Realities of the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan

Conflict photographers like Michael Kamber and Louie Palu have spent years covering the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. They’ve lost friends, been very nearly killed themselves, and come back with incredible (and sometimes hard to stomach) photos.

Both of their work is currently on display alongside many of their peers’ at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington DC, and in the short video above, they share the stories behind some of their most moving imagery. (Note: the above video contains some strong imagery) Read more…

My Journey to Angola

A photographer shares his experience in documenting a war-torn African nation after entering the country with a humanitarian visa.

Jeff Widener · Aug 02, 2013 · 4 Comments » ·

CrowdMedia to Disrupt Photojournalism Industry with Crowdsourced Social Pics

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Attention photojournalists: As if times weren’t tough enough already, a new startup wants to replace your work with Twitter-based crowdsourcing.
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Covertimes: Enjoy Front Page Newspaper Photos from Around the World

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News photographers have a potentially valuable new tool with Covertimes, a new website that congregates images of front pages from newspapers around the world.
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Newspaper Chain in Georgia Shutters Its Photo Department, Lays Off Photogs

southerncommunity

Less than two months after the Chicago Sun-Times closed up its photo department and disbanded its staff photography team, a newspaper chain in Georgia has done the same.

Southern Community Newspapers Inc. (SCNI), a chain of seven Georgian newspapers (five dailies and two weeklies), is completely shutting down its photo department and putting photo-making responsibilities in the hands of its reporters.
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The Asiana Airlines Flight 214 Crash Site, As Photographed by the NTSB

9116ZRx

The media has been dominated by coverage of Asiana Airlines Flight 214′s crash landing in San Francisco this past weekend. What’s interesting is that some of the most powerful photographs showing the aftermath were not captured by professional photojournalists, but rather those with the most access to the site: US government employees.
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