Posts Tagged ‘photographer’

Mary Ellen Mark Shares Thoughts on Capturing Iconic Images

Here’s a short video in which renowned American photographer Mary Ellen Mark shares some thoughts on photography and iconic photographs. Her advice for aspiring documentary photographers:

If you love it and you really want to do it, then you must do it because you’ll never forgive yourself for not doing something you cared about or you believed in, if you don’t do it now.

(via Profoto)

Turn Your Old Point-and-Shoot Camera Into a Creative Nightlight

Perhaps inspired by the vintage camera nightlights we shared last year, photographer Laura Merz decided to upcycle her old Kodak digital camera by turning it into a nightlight for her house. She writes,

I took out all the tiny screws and gutted the camera very carefully as to not crack the exterior case. Be careful — some of the parts are pretty sharp. Removing the lens is the last step, and allows you to insert a small round night light through the opening. I had to crack off the exterior casing on the night light, but with a little force, it snapped right off.

It’s a creative way to breathe new life into an outdated or broken digital camera.

A Day In the Life of a College Football Photographer

Want to know what it’s like to cover a football game as the chief photographer of a school’s athletic department? Photographer Joel Hawksley created this day-in-the-life time-lapse video after being assigned to cover a football game between Ohio University and Temple University. It starts early in the morning when he pulls out of his driveway, and ends at night when he pulls in. In between we see everything from setting up, shooting, post-processing, and uploading/emailing photographs. Hawksley used a Nikon D700 and D300 to photograph the game, and a Canon G9 to capture the time-lapse images throughout the day.

Bruce Davidson on Photographing the New York City Subway System

Back in the spring of 1980, Magnum photographer Bruce Davidson began to photograph the subway system in NYC for his project titled Subway. NYRBlog has published an interesting essay — an excerpt from the introduction of Davidson’s book — in which the photographer talks about his experience:

To prepare myself for the subway, I started a crash diet, a military fitness exercise program, and early every morning I jogged in the park. I knew I would need to train like an athlete to be physically able to carry my heavy camera equipment around in the subway for hours every day. Also, I thought that if anything was going to happen to me down there I wanted to be in good shape, or at least to believe that I was. Each morning I carefully packed my cameras, lenses, strobe light, filters, and accessories in a small, canvas camera bag. In my green safari jacket with its large pockets, I placed my police and subway passes, a few rolls of film, a subway map, a notebook, and a small, white, gold-trimmed wedding album containing pictures of people I’d already photographed in the subway. In my pants pocket I carried quarters for the people in the subway asking for money, change for the phone, and several tokens. I also carried a key case with additional identification and a few dollars tucked inside, a whistle, and a small Swiss Army knife that gave me a little added confidence. I had a clean handkerchief and a few Band-Aids in case I found myself bleeding.

It’s an interesting glimpse into the mind of a photographer who takes his work very seriously.

Train of Thought: On the ‘Subway’ Photographs (via kottke.org)

Joel Meyerowitz’s Street Photography

Here’s an hour-long program from 1981 that featured Joel Meyerowitz and his street photography in New York City.

(via shooting gallery)

A Glimpse of Street Photographer Garry Winogrand at Work

This video was shot by a German film crew in the early 1980s, and shows American street photographer Garry Winogrand at work. Although he died of bladder cancer at age 56, his photographic output during his lifetime was enormous, even compared to other photographers:

Consider this: at his death, Winogrand left behind 2500 undeveloped rolls of 36-exposure 35mm film (mostly Tri-X), 6,500 rolls of film that had been developed but not contact-printed–not to mention 300 apparently untouched, unedited 35mm contact sheets.

Do the math. Conservatively, that’s at least 300,000 pictures – equal to at least two life’s work for anyone else–that Winogrand took but never even saw, so busy he already had been photographing the world around him. [#]

That explains why Winogrand is able to load new film into his Leica so effortlessly while talking to the camera — he could probably do it in his sleep.

(via tokyo camera style)

Theory vs. Reality: How Photographers Actually Spend Their Time

The International Society of Professional Wedding Photographers did a study a couple years ago on how photographers spend their time, and published these two charts showing the difference between what the general public thinks and what is actually the case. Here’s a larger version.

(via ISPWP via Scott Kelby)

A Day in the Life of Fashion Photographer Peter Stigter

Here’s an interesting behind-the-scenes video that shows what a workday is like for fashion photographer Peter Stigter.

It’s a hectic job, being a runway photographer. Racing through the city, meeting editors, dragging your box up and down the stairs, getting you equipment ready. And then, finally the show starts. Suddenly everything becomes quiet.

It’d be awesome if every professional photographer made a video like this to give people a glimpse into their lives. If you know of any similar videos for other photographers, link us to them in the comments!

(via ISO 1200)

Adjusting to the Changing Landscape of Professional Photography

Photographer Michael Freeman says that although things are getting tougher for professional photographers, the “consumption of imagery in all areas is actually increasing”. Professionals therefore need to think more about marketing themselves and specializing in a particular niche.

(via PhotoFidelity)

Sports Photography Can be Hazardous to Your Health

Canada’s TSN created this “Top 10″ compilation of clips showing sports photographers and cameramen getting way too close to balls, pucks, feet, and fists.

(via Fstoppers)