Posts Tagged ‘photobooks’

13 Photo Books for Your Stocking Stuffers

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In the age of the iPad, there still is something glorious about a photo book. Here are a few of our favorites from 2014, so send Santa (or Hanukah Harry) a quick tweet, and get a big dose of inspiration this Holiday season. Read more…

10 of the Most Collectable Photo Books of All Time

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Online book marketplace AbeBooks — probably the first link you’ll see if you try to search for a rare, signed or early edition of your favorite novel or photo book — has a list of the 10 most collectable photography books of all time. You can probably guess two or three of them, but do you think you know them all? Read more…

Yahoo! Introduces New Flickr Photo Books Service, Keeps Flickr Renaissance Going

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Just in time for the Holidays, Yahoo! is introducing a new service for printing custom photo books through Flickr, touting automatic features and a “clean, stunning design” that the company hopes will encourage Flickr users to take advantage of the new feature instead of going elsewhere for their photo book needs. Read more…

Go Behind the Scenes at the Largest Pro Photo Lab in the United States

Miller’s Professional Imaging is the largest professional photo lab in the United States, with facilities in Pittsburg, Kansas and Columbia, Missouri that offer a slew of printing services for hobbyists, semi-pro and professional photographers alike. In the above video, Chris Marquardt of Photography Tips from the Top Floor treats us to a behind the scenes look at the company’s 40,000 square-foot facility in Columbia, MO. Read more…

DIY Large Format Camera Created From Photography Books

Artists Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs create homemade cameras out of bizarre objects such as turtle shells and large stones. The large format camera above was crafted out of a stack of photography books. Their experiments are documented in a book titled As Long As It Photographs It Must Be a Camera. You can find a recent interview with the artists over at American Photo.

Turning Turtles Into Cameras With Onorato & Krebs (via Photojojo)

Photographer Lets Exhibition Attendees Build Their Own DIY Photo Books

In 1974, Japanese photographer Daido Moriyama had an exhibition in Tokyo called “Printing Show” that featured a Xerox machine in the center of the room manned by Moriyama himself. Visitors were encouraged to select photos from the show, which were then reproduced and assembled into custom photo books. This past weekend, Moriyama repeated the show in New York, once again using a photocopier to provide attendees with custom signed editions of the DIY book. The book was titled “TKY” and bound in a nice silk-screened cover.
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Keepsy Lets Popular Instagram Photogs Cash In Their Following

Millions of people know Instagram as a fun way to share photographs, but get popular enough on the service and it can be a profitable one as well. Keepsy, a startup that helps people quickly create albums from Instagram and Facebook photos, has launched a new curated gallery featuring top Instagram artists. Fans can purchase photobooks from the site at a price set by the artist, and profits are split 50/50 between the service and the photographer. While only about 20 users are represented currently, they’re planning to slowly add more based on merit.

The gallery is also a good place to find people to follow for fresh inspiration.

Featured Photographers (via Mashable and TechCrunch)

Collectible Photobooks Soaring in Value

If you’re looking for a fun photography-related way to invest some money, you might want to look into photobook collecting. The Guardian writes that prices have been soaring in recent years, and not just for expensive rare editions:

Photobooks are expensive to produce and, while demand is too small to warrant long print runs or multiple reprints, it is large enough that the books remain desirable, soon become scarce and can eventually be very valuable. This means new editions costing between £20 and £60 can double or triple in price in as little as two to five years. In 10 or 20 years – and if the work of the photographer becomes particularly fashionable – the price may increase even more.

[…] one of the great things about photobook collecting is discovering the work of emerging photographers whose early books may become sought after. A good place to look is among the current boom in self-published titles.

They also list a number of currently in-print photobooks that can help you get started.

Photobooks – affordable collectibles that are soaring in value [The Guardian]


Image credit: Paris Photobook by rthakrar

Instant Instagram Books by Blurb

You can now create instant photo books with your favorite Instagram (AKA two-minute noodle) photos using Blurb. After logging into the page with your Instagram account, your most “liked” photo is used for the cover and the rest of the pages are filled with your most recent images (they can be changed, of course). A 40-photo, 20-page book starts at $11.

Make Instagram books with Blurb [Blurb]

Group Story Lets You Build Collaborative Photo Books

Group Story is a new photo service that’s centered around building photo books collaboratively with other people who photographed the same event. For example, the parents of a soccer team could pool photographs together and create a photo book documenting the soccer season.

Everything is done through a simple web interface, and after photographs are uploaded, you can use any of the photographs in the group to create a page. Once pages are created, you can use any of the pages in the group to create a physical photo book.

The resulting 8×8 inch books cost $13 for 20 pages in a softcover format, and $25 for hardcover. Additional pages are 50 cents each. There isn’t currently any feature for sharing the resulting books through the web, but providing an embeddable photo book that users can post online and/or link to might be a good future feature.

Some of the larger players in the photo space are also thinking hard about making photos more collaborative and social. Just early last month Facebook acquired group photo sharing service Divvyshot.

(via Mashable)