Posts Tagged ‘photo’

Media Publishes Wrong Facebook Photo in Wake of Tragic Shooting

Earlier today, unimaginable tragedy struck the town of Newtown, Connecticut as 20 children and 6 adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School were gunned down by a man we now know to be 20-year-old Adam Lanza.

As details poured in over the course of the day, Lanza — who took his own life at the scene — was mistakenly identified by police as Ryan, his older brother. Because of this mistake, news organizations nationwide began searching for pictures of a Ryan Lanza matching the description of the gunman, subsequently stumbling upon and disseminating the wrong picture for several hours.
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Viral Hoax Facebook Update is Powerless to Protect Your Photo Copyrights

One of the big stories in the tech world at the moment is Facebook’s effort to do away with its public voting system for approving changes to the service’s policies (yup, Facebook is a democracy). Pranksters are taking advantage of the controversy to stir up some FUD among Facebook users. One of the things that has been circulating over the past few days is a bogus “chain letter” that people are posting as status updates, believing that their photograph copyrights are at risk. The message is spreading like wildfire — many of you have likely seen it already — but there’s one big problem: it’s all a complete hoax.
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Woman Disrespects Military in Facebook Photo, Has Life Turned Upside-Down

It’s a story that’s becoming more and more common: someone uploads tactless photos to the Internet, the Internet disapproves and collectively pounces on the person. It happened after Hurricane Sandy when a Brazilian model decided to do a photo shoot amidst the devastation, and it has happened again. The target of the Internet’s fury this time is a woman named Lindsey Stone, who posted the above photograph to her Facebook page.
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New York Magazine Cover Features Photo of a Blacked-Out New York City

Everyone seems to be talking about the cover photo of this week’s issue of New York Magazine. It shows NYC blacked out after Hurricane Sandy, and was captured last Wednesday by Dutch photographer Iwan Baan from the open door of a helicopter 5,000 feet above the ground. Poynter has published an interesting behind-the-scenes look at how it was shot:

Baan made the image Wednesday night after the storm, using the new Canon 1D X with the new 24-70mm lens on full open aperture. The camera was set at 25,000 ISO, with a 1/40th of a second shutter speed [...]

It was more difficult to rent a car than a helicopter in New York the day after Sandy, Baan said. And because there was such limited air traffic so soon after the storm, air traffic control allowed Baan and the helicopter to hover very high above the city, a powerful advantage for the photo.

NY Mag editors say that picking the cover photo was the easiest choice they had to make this past week. They’ve also published a slideshow featuring 10 aerial photographs Baan captured that night.

Architecture photographer explains how he got that New York magazine cover shot [Poynter]


Image credit: Photograph by Iwan Baan/New York Magazine

How Jay-Z’s “Blueprint 3″ Album Cover Was Shot Using a Projector and Paint

The photo above is the album cover for Jay-Z’s 2009 album Blueprint 3, featuring a photo of a pile of musical instruments and recording equipment with three red lines across the front. It might look Photoshopped — an easy way to create such an effect — but it was actually done with perspective trickery and good ol’ fashioned hard work.
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First Leaked Photo of the Sony A99, the First Full Frame Pellicle Mirror Camera

Here’s the first leaked photograph of Sony’s upcoming high-end full-frame single-lens-translucent DSLR, the A99. sonyalpharumors confirmed the authenticity of the image, which was first leaked onto the chinese website Xitek. We’ll likely be seeing the official announcement on Wednesday, September 12.

The A99 is designed to compete with high-end full frame DSLRs like the Canon 5D Mark III, and marks a departure from the optical viewfinders found in previous Sony full frame models — the A900 and A850. It’s the first pellicle mirror camera by Sony to feature a full frame sensor. It features a 24.3MP sensor, 10fps continuous shooting, 102 AF points (11 cross), a 3-inch tilting LCD, and in-body image stabilization. You can find some more specs in this post from last week.

Using Photos to Communicate While in a Foreign Country

Preparing for a trip to a foreign country where you don’t know the language? If you don’t have an Internet-connected phone handy, a camera can help you out. Redditor Jhojgaard regularly travels to various countries around the world, and suggests that storing some key photos on your camera can come in handy when you’re in a communication crunch.

Things that are useful to store on your memory card include the names of places you need to get to and common things you might need (e.g. a certain subway station, the restroom, a taxi). If you have a smartphone with you, you can toss all of the “translation photos” into a separate album.
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Eye Candy: Cocoagraph Turns Your Photos into Polaroid Chocolate Bars

Cocoagraph is a Philly-based chocolate company that turns customer photos into Polaroid-style chocolate bars. It’s a fun and tasty way to make your photos a treat for the eyes and the mouth.
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Lettuce-Defiling Burger King Employee Located Using EXIF Data, Fired

This past Monday, someone posted a photo to imageboard 4chan showing a Burger King employee stomping on two tubs of lettuce. The caption read “This is the lettuce you eat at Burger King.” Other tech-savvy vigilante users immediately pounced on the case in hopes of identifying the poster. Unfortunately for the lettuce defiler, the photograph was taken with geotagging enabled, allowing the EXIF data to be used to zero in on the precise restaurant where the image was created: 1475 Worton Boulevard, Mayfield Heights, OH.
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The First Instagram Photo Uploaded Exactly Two Years Ago

Exactly two years ago today, Instagram testers uploaded the very first image to an app called Codename: a simple photograph of a sandaled foot and a dog. Three months later, Codename launched to the public as Instagram, the $1 billion photo app that boasts 50 million users who have shared 1 billion photographs.

(via Instagram)