Posts Tagged ‘phantom’

First Slow-Motion Phantom Miro M120 Video Doesn’t Disappoint

Cinematographer Jim Geduldick was lucky enough to be the first to test out Vision Research’s new Phantom Miro M120 high-speed camera in the real world, and — luckily for the rest of us — is kind enough to share the results. Falling on the smaller, more rugged side of the Phantom line, the M120 is made to take, well, exactly the kind of footage Geduldick captured. The camera can shoot a whopping 1540 at full 1080p HD, and is estimated to cost anywhere from $25,000 to $60,000 — a bargain compared to the price tags on its more expensive siblings.

(via Gizmodo)

Stupid Things in Super Slow Motion

There’s a Danish TV show called “Dumt & Farligt” in which two guys are given a house and the task of doing stupid and dangerous things that come to mind. In addition to recording the experiments in real time, the show decided to also use a Phantom Flex high speed camera to capturing everything at 2,500 frames per second. The video above provides a slow motion look at things ranging from setting off large fireworks indoors to microwaving a bottle of red wine.

(via kottke.org)

A DSLR Camera Shutter in Slow Motion

Destin of Smarter Every Day wanted to show how a DSLR shutter works, so he pointed a Phantom high speed camera at a Canon 60D and made this slow motion video showing the magic that happens every time you press the shutter.

Slow Motion Comparison: 500, 1000, 2500, 5000 and 10000 FPS

Gav of The Slow Mo Guys made this interesting video comparing different high-speed camera frame rates. Using a Phantom HD camera, he films coffee mugs shattering on pavement at 500, 1000, 2500, 5000, and 10000 frames per second.

Giant Waves Captured in Super Slow-Mo

Cinematographer Chris Bryan used a Phantom HD Gold camera in a custom underwater housing to capture super slow-motion footage of waves in Sydney, Australia. Water looks amazing at thousands of frames per second. Be sure to watch it full screen and in high-def.

(via PhotoWeeklyOnline)

Eagle Owl Attacking Camera at 1000fps

While we’re on the topic of high-speed cameras (and slow motion videos), here’s a beautiful slow-motion video of an eagle owl “attacking” a camera, shot at 1,000fps with a Photron FASTCAM SA2. The new Phantom v1610 camera announced today can record footage 1000 times slower than this.

(via kottke.org)

New Phantom v1610 Camera Can Shoot a Staggering 1,000,000fps

Shooting 4.5 million frames per second of molecules using an x-ray flash is impressive, but can non-scientific cameras come anywhere close? The answer is yes: Vision Research has a new Phantom high speed camera called the v1610 that can capture footage at a whopping 1,000,000fps. Granted, the resolution needs to be a paltry 128×16 for that fps, but at a full 1280×800 it still shoots at 16,000fps. To give you an idea of what 1 million fps is like, consider this: 1 second of the footage will provide you with 9.25 hours of uber-slow motion 30fps video.

Phantom v1610 (via PopSci)

Vibrations Invisible to the Human Eye Shot at 1,000 Frames Per Second

Vibration tester manufacturer Fluke recently published this video showing what the world of vibration looks like at 1,000 frames per second.

So much of movement is invisible to the human eye. Sure, our eyes can see a cymbal move when struck by a drum stick. But it’s what our eyes can’t see that is most captivating. Metal rippling as if it were fabric fluttering in the wind, droplets of water bouncing and hovering just above the surface of a puddle; the beauty and science of movement is in the details. And the details are often the result of vibrations. [#]

Everything was shot using a Phantom HD Gold high speed camera.

(via Laughing Squid)

Camera Flash Bulb Shot at 1052FPS

Ever wonder what you camera flash would look like if you watched it in super slow motion? Thanks to Phantom high speed cameras you can wonder no more! This flash bulb (the single-use kind used in old film cameras) was captured at 1052 frames per second.

(via f stoppers)

Match Igniting at 2000 Frames per Second

This is what lighting a match looks like up close and in super slow-mo at 2000 frames per second. Who knew the process was so bubbly and gross?

(via Laughing Squid)