Posts Tagged ‘pbs’

‘Photography Made Difficult': The Life and Work of Photojournalist W. Eugene Smith

“Photography Made Difficult” is a 1989 documentary about the career of renowned photojournalist William Eugene Smith, a man who helped to pioneer the concept of the photo essay. It runs 1 hour and 40 minutes long.
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Trevor Paglen on Photographing Secret Military Sites with a Telescope

PBS series Art in the 21st Century recently released this 6-minute look at the work of photographer Trevor Paglen, a guy who points his camera through astronomy telescopes at secret military sites to photography things that are off limits to the public. As we shared back in 2012, Paglen calls his imagery “Limit Telephotography.”
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Recreating the Incredibly Accurate CGI Black Hole in Interstellar with In-Camera Elements

The black hole in the highly-anticipated Christopher Nolan blockbuster Interstellar has already made headlines. Put together with some serious mathematical help from astrophysicist Kip Thorne, it was so accurate he’s actually going to get a few academic papers out of it.

It is, however, 100% CGI and as such outside of our purview as photographers… until now. Just a few days away from the movie’s debut, Shanks FX and PBS decided to recreate the effect using all in-camera elements they’ve shown you how to create before. Read more…

PBS Defends the Selfie in New ‘Why Do We Hate Selfies’ Idea Channel Episode

Defending the selfie in this day and age is a dangerous angle to take, but the folks at the PBS Idea Channel are taking a swing at it because, in their words, “despite being possibly the world’s most annoying habit, selfies are undeniably a major part of modern visual language.” Read more…

Film Takes on Digital in Head-to-Head PBS Showdown, Can You Tell the Difference?

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When it comes to the Film Vs. Digital debate, many people are fairly entrenched on one side or the other. But can you really tell the difference between RAW digital footage and film footage? What about when the digital footage is made to look like film using filters in post? PBS Digital Studios wants to put you to the test. Read more…

A Look at the Past, Present and Future of Stop Motion Animation

Stop motion animation has seen a resurgence of late. In addition to filmmakers continuing to make use of the technique despite the rise of CGI, stop motion apps for smartphones and outlets like Vine and Instagram video have brought many amateurs to the table as well.

Now it’s possible for everyone to discover the time-consuming joy of shooting little stop motion creations. Read more…

Exploring the Art of Portrait Photography and the Role of the Portrait Today

Capturing our likeness has been a pursuit of the human race for thousands of years. From paintings of gods in Egypt and Greece, to portrait paintings of royalty, to the unabashedly narcissistic selfie of today.

In this week’s episode of PBS Arts’ webseries Off Book the topic of the day is portraiture, a subject each of the four interviewees takes on from their own unique angle. Read more…

Photojournalist Julian Cardona on Documenting the Evolution of Juarez

Mexican photojournalist Julian Cardona has lived in Ciudad Juarez since 1960 and began documenting the city in the early 1990s as a photojournalist for the local newspaper, El Diario. He says he’s seen Juarez shift from an idyllic postcard-worthy border town to the city known as the homicide capital of the world.
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Street Photographer Kip Praslowicz Shares His Approach to Portraiture

Here’s a short video by PBS about Duluth, Minnesota-based street photographer Kip Praslowicz. Praslowicz talks about his work and his approach to shooting in his community.

(via Erik Kim)


P.S. Last year we featured a humorous guest post by Praslowicz

Seeing Beyond the Human Eye

“Science can be beautiful. Art can be scientific.” This latest episode of the PBS series Off Book, titled “Seeing Beyond the Human Eye“, looks into how science and photographic techniques are helping transform how we see the world.

Technology defies the boundaries of human perception. From photomicrography to astrophotography, size and distance are no longer barriers, and through slow-mo and timelapse, we are allowed to see time and humanity in a new light. Through our curiosity and thirst for the unknown, the beauty of the universe can now be explored beyond the limits of the naked eye.