Posts Tagged ‘passingoftime’

Before and After Portraits That Show the Effects of Time and Aging

identities-2

For her project titled “Identities,” London-based photographer Ana Oliveira created a series of before and after photos that show the effects of time and aging.
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Time-Lapse: 15 Months of a Forest’s Life in 3 Minutes

Photographer Samuel Orr shot 40,000 photographs over 15 months (between 2006-2008) to create the time-lapse video seen above. It shows the view he had from his front window at the time, from his home in a wooded region just outside Bloomington, Indiana. The short is titled, “Forest Year.”
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Time-Lapse Shows the Passing of a Day in New York City in 100,000+ Photos

Time-lapse photographer Samuel Orr has completed a beautiful short film of New York City that shows the passing of a day in the Big Apple in a beautiful way.
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Ripped Photo Collages That Show People in Locations Across Time

For his project titled Time, photographer John Clang shoots various locations multiple times from the same perspective, and then rips and weaves the photographs together to show multiple points in time in each image.

A series that involves recording a location, to show the passing of time in a montage style. There is a sense of intimate intricacy of how time moves, and how people, albeit in a different time, are actually closer to one another and traveling in the same shared space. I’ve always been intrigued by the constant subtle changes in my urban environment.

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365-Day Time-Lapse of a Bike Locked on a NYC Sidewalk

Red Peak Branding conducted an experiment last year in which they chained a fully loaded bicycle (bells, basket, lights, and the whole shebang) to a post on a busy New York City sidewalk. They then visited and photographed the bicycle every single day, resulting in the 365-photo time-lapse video seen above. What’s interesting is that the bicycle remains untouched for roughly 230 days, but once small parts start getting stolen the rest of the bicycle soon follows. This might have something to do with what’s called the “broken windows theory“.

(via Gawker)

3888 Photos Captured Over One Year Condensed Into One Image

While we’re on the subject of photos captured over the course of one year, check out this crazy time-lapse photograph by Eirik Solheim of Oslo, Norway (whose time-lapse video work we’ve featured before). The image shows the passing of one year starting from January on the left and ending with December on the right, and comprises 3888 photographs captured during the days that were then combined using a special script that uses one vertical segment from each image.

One year in one image (via Photojojo)

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Dad Films 25 Years of Kids Coming Down Stairs on Christmas Morning

For 25 years, YouTube user spoonito‘s father would record footage of spoonito and his sister walking down the stairs on Christmas morning. The video above is a compilation of the videos that shows the passing of 25 years, and the coming and going of relatives and pets.

“A History of the Sky”: The Passing of a Year in a Mosaic of Time-Lapses

Ken Murphy has completed his ambitious “A History of the Sky” project, which we first got a glimpse of in March of last year. Wanting to reveal the patterns of light and weather over the course of a year, Murphy installed a still camera on the roof of the Exploratorium in San Francisco, pointed at the sky and snapping a photo every 10 seconds around the clock.

After a year had passed, Murphy made this time-lapse mosaic, with each box — arranged chronologically — showing the time-lapse of a single day. They’re all synchronized by time-of-day, and provide an interesting way of looking how sunrises, sunsets, and weather change over the course of a year.

24-Hour Time-Lapse of Downtown Dubai

On 11/11/11, Gerald Donovan aimed his Canon 5D Mark II and 14mm f/2.8 at Downtown Dubai and set it to shoot one photograph every 30 seconds. He left it there for 24 hours, and then took the 2880 photographs and turned them into this beautiful time-lapse showing the passing of a day. What’s neat is that the reflection of the sun and moon can be seen going up and down the Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world.

(via Gizmodo via Doobybrain)

Creative Stop-Motion Video Announcing a New Baby

Here’s a super-awesome way of using stop-motion photography to announce the birth of a new baby.

(via Fstoppers)