Posts Tagged ‘passageoftime’

Time-Lapse of a Boy from Birth to Age 9

Two days ago we shared Frans Hofmeester’s wonderful time-lapse video of his daughter aging from birth to 12 in three minutes. That video has gone viral on the Internet, receiving a whopping four million views in less than a week. Hofmeester is actually doing the same project for his son Vince: the video above shows the boy aging from birth to age 9 in two minutes.

Time-Lapse of a Girl from Birth to Age 12

After his daughter Lotte was born, Dutch photographer Frans Hofmeester began creating weekly videos of her to document her growth. Lotte recently turned 12, and Hofmeester decided to edit all the footage so far into this amazing time-lapse video showing twelve years of growing up in just under three minutes.

Spliced Family Photos from Two Different Times in Life

New York-based photography student Vicki Thai has a project titled Family Photographs that consists of images created by splicing (by tearing and reassembling) family photographs shot during two different times.
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Man Records 1 Second of Footage from Each Day at Age 30

Cesar Kuriyama spent a couple years saving enough money to take an entire year off from work — his 30th year of life. He spent that year living frugally, doing all the things he never had enough time to do: travelling, personal creative projects, and spending time with family. He decided to document that special year by capturing 1 second of footage every single day and creating a short compilation video at the end, similar to Madeline’s video that we shared back in January. After completing the year, Kuriyama now is planning to capture 1 second from each day for the rest of his life. This means he’ll have a 5-hour video summarizing 50 years of life if he lives to be 80, since every decade creates roughly one hour of video.

(via Coudal)

Photographs Captured Over Years with an Open Camera Shutter

German photographer Michael Wesely has spent decades working on techniques for extremely long camera exposures — usually between two to three years. In the mid-1990s, he began using the technique to document urban development over time, capturing years of building projects in single frames. In 1997, he focused his cameras on the rebuilding of Potsdamer Platz in Berlin, and in 2001 he began photographing the Museum of Modern Art’s ambitious renovation project. He uses filters and extremely small apertures to reduce the amount of light striking the film, creating unique images that capture both space and time.
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Beautiful Mosaics of Trees Photographed Across Time

Photographer Noel Myles has been working for the past 15 years on “still films” of trees across the countryside of eastern England. He originally created platinum/palladium prints of the trees around the year 2000, and then photographed the trees a decade later using color film. He then combined pieces from the different photos into single mosaics, which he tells us are “the antithesis of the notion of a decisive moment”.
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Ripped Photo Collages That Show People in Locations Across Time

For his project titled Time, photographer John Clang shoots various locations multiple times from the same perspective, and then rips and weaves the photographs together to show multiple points in time in each image.

A series that involves recording a location, to show the passing of time in a montage style. There is a sense of intimate intricacy of how time moves, and how people, albeit in a different time, are actually closer to one another and traveling in the same shared space. I’ve always been intrigued by the constant subtle changes in my urban environment.

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Portraits of People in Two Different Times

AgeMaps is a project by photographer Bobby Neel Adams in which he does “photo surgery” on portraits to show two different moments in a person’s life in the same image. For each subject, Adams takes a childhood photo and a current photo, prints them at the same proportions, tears them in half, and glues the halves together. He says that this is to “telescope the slow process of aging into a single picture,” and that “a jump of time is established at the tear.”
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Guy Documents His Year by Doing One Backflip Per Day

Last week we featured an amazing video by a girl named Madeline who documented 2011 by recording 1 second of footage from each day. The video above by Sam Morrison is similar: Morrison’s father bet him $100 that he couldn’t do a backflip every day of 2011, so he made it his New Year’s resolution to do so. After successfully completing the project, Morrison created the video above showing his favorite flips. The 365 individual videos can be viewed on this Tumblr page dedicated to the project. How’s that for a Project 365?

365-Day Time-Lapse of a Bike Locked on a NYC Sidewalk

Red Peak Branding conducted an experiment last year in which they chained a fully loaded bicycle (bells, basket, lights, and the whole shebang) to a post on a busy New York City sidewalk. They then visited and photographed the bicycle every single day, resulting in the 365-photo time-lapse video seen above. What’s interesting is that the bicycle remains untouched for roughly 230 days, but once small parts start getting stolen the rest of the bicycle soon follows. This might have something to do with what’s called the “broken windows theory“.

(via Gawker)