Posts Tagged ‘paris’

Gutsy Photog Rappels Down Skyscrapers to Capture Stunning Architecture Shots

Architecture shots are often taken from one of three places: the ground, the roof, or inside a building looking out. That’s because the only real alternative after that is to take your photos from outside the building, while being on neither the roof nor the ground.

If that sounds like something only Peter Parker ever managed, think again. Parisian photographer Carlos Ayesta‘s Vertical Architecture photos take advantage of a vantage point once reserved for Spiderman. Read more…

Video: Photographers Attacked During Riots in Paris

A huge anti-gay-marriage protest in Paris turned violent yesterday, leading to hundreds of arrests and tens of injuries. Among those attacked by rioters were photojournalists documenting the scene. An attack on two photographers was captured in the video above. It’s interesting to see that although nearby photographers come to the aid of their colleague, they first stop to snap some photos of the scuffle prior to doing so.

(via Reddit)

Photographer Snaps a Horizon Rainbow Alongside the Eiffel Tower

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Photographer Bertrand Kulik was standing at his window in Paris last week when he noticed something peculiar about the horizon. Although his view is ordinarily quite beautiful because of the Eiffel Tower dominating the cityscape, this time it had something he was treated with a bright and colorful horizon rainbow painted across the sky in the distance.
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Location Recognition for Photographs by Looking at Architecture

Cameras these days are smart enough to recognize the faces found inside photographs and label them with names. What if the same kind of recognition could be done for the locations of photographs? What if, instead of using satellite geodata, the camera could simply recognize where it is by the contents of the photographs?

That’s what research being done at Carnegie Mellon University and INRIA/Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris may one day lead to. A group of researchers have created a computer program that can identify the distinctive architectural elements of major cities by processing street-level photos.
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Beautiful Stop Motion and Time Lapse Tour of Paris

Nothing like starting off the weekend with some gorgeous footage of the City of Lights. This video comes courtesy of motion time lapse and stop motion photographer Mayeul Akpovi and is an awesome example of exactly those two things. Combining three thousand night shots and day shots with different landmarks and locations and a slew of different time lapse techniques really brings out a new side of the beautiful French capital.

Michael Wolf On His Fascination With “Peeping”

When photographer Michael Wolf had to move to Paris in 2008 because of a job opportunity for his wife, he wasn’t too thrilled with the situation. He thought that living in one of the most photographed cities of all time, surrounded by the inevitable cliches of such a place, wasn’t conducive to creative, unique photography. So he sat down at his computer and began browsing through the then only 6-month old Google Street View, which ultimately led to a unique photographical project that fit right in with his long-time fascination with “peeping” into people’s lives through photography. Read more…

3D Glass Plate Photos From the 1930s

Paris-based photo enthusiast Alexis was passing a thrift store near his home recently when he noticed some strange looking optical equipment. Upon entering the shop for a better view, he discovered that it was an old stereograph viewer with ground glass in the rear. The store owner informed him that the viewer came with a box of roughly 50 glass plates made in France in the 1930s. Alexis jumped on the deal and, upon returning home, was pleasantly surprised to find that the images were beautiful 3D photographs of what living in France was like nearly a century ago.
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A Glimpse Behind the Gare St. Lazare in Google Street View

If you go to Google Street View and type in “rue de londres, paris“, you can visit the location where photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson captured his famous street photograph Behind the Gare St. Lazare in 1932. It’s an ordinary location that became an iconic photograph through Cartier-Bresson’s “decisive moment” style of photography. Cartier-Bresson notes,

There was a plank fence around some repairs behind the Gare Saint Lazare train station. I happened to be peeking through a gap in the fence with my camera at the moment the man jumped. The space between the planks was not entirely wide enough for my lens, which is the reason why the picture is cut off on the left.

If you know of any other iconic photo locations that can be revisited through Google Street View, leave a comment!

rue de londres, paris” in Google Maps (via Erik Kim)

Inception-esque Photo of a Street in Paris

A ‘vortograph’ is a photo taken using a triangular arrangement of three mirrors. The process was invented back in 1917 by an American photographer named Alvin Langdon Coburn. Photographer Simon Gardiner decided to try his hand at vortography, and created this beautiful Inception-esque photograph of the Champs-Élysées in Paris [using Photoshop].

From the sky down (via Colossal)


Update: As was pointed out by keen eyed PP readers, Gardiner actually relied on Photoshop for the effect seen in this example. We’ve updated the post to reflect this fact.


Image credit: Photograph by Simon Gardiner and used with permission

Time-Lapse Strolls Through the Streets of Famous Cities

Ask a photographer to shoot a time-lapse portrait of a city, and they might choose a number of famous locations to photograph with a fixed camera. Photographer Jesse Kopp, however, prefers to stay at the ground level and photograph what it feels like to actually be roaming around the streets. He visits famous cities around the world and creates time-lapse videos out of photos taken while walking from landmark to landmark. It’s an awesome way to get a feel of what each city is like (the video above shows Paris).
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