Posts Tagged ‘panoramas’

Panoramic Pictures of Famous Locations Made From Carefully Shot 35mm Film

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German photographer Thomas Kellner creates large-scale panoramas of famous locations using 35mm film. Rather than have the shots printed or digitized, Kellner uses scans of the film strips themselves. The rolls are kept in their long strips, which means Keller meticulously plans out and carefully shoots every shot to have the frames come together when the strips are placed side by side.
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Google Brings 360-Degree Panoramas to Android with Photo Sphere

Apple may have launched a neat panorama feature with iOS 6, but Google is one-upping the Cupertino-based company today with its new Jelly Bean flavor: Android 4.2. The OS now comes with an official 360-degree panorama app called Photo Sphere.
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Trippy 180-Degree Vertical Panoramas of Churches in New York City

New York City is undoubtedly one of the most photographed cities on Earth, but photographer Richard Silver doesn’t let that fact faze him. He’s on a personal mission to capture facets of The Big Apple in ways people have never seen before. A month ago, we shared his New York Sliced series, which consists of spliced photos of buildings that show day turning into night.

Silver has now followed that project up with a new one titled, NY Churches, which documents the various churches in NYC through beautiful (and disorienting) vertical panoramas.
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Google Street View Now Has Underwater Panoramas of the Great Barrier Reef

If you’ve always wanted to go scuba diving at the Great Barrier Reef but haven’t had a chance to, this might be one of the next best things: Google has added gorgeous underwater panoramic photographs to Street View, allowing to swim around at the world’s largest coral system as if it were a street in your neighborhood.
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Crowdsourced Panoramas Tracking How Locations Change Over Time

Picture Post is an interesting (and NASA-funded) citizen science project that turns photographers into citizen scientists, crowdsourcing the task of environmental monitoring. Anyone around the world can install a Picture Post:

A Picture Post is a 4”x4” post made of wood or recycled plastic with enough of the post buried in the ground so it extends below the frost line and stays secure throughout the year. Atop the post is a small octagonal-shaped platform or cap on which you can rest your camera to take a series of nine photographs.

People who walk by can then use the guide on the post to capture 9 photos in all directions, and upload them to the Picture Post website. The resulting panoramas can then be browsed by date, giving a cool look at how a particular location changes over time.
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360-Degree Panoramas of Hiroshima After the Atomic Bomb

Six months after the atomic bomb “Little Boy” was dropped on Hiroshima, three American photographers and one Japanese photographer shot panoramas from five different locations to document the devastation. Mari Shimomura of the Hiroshima Peace Museum recently gave high-resolution scans of these panoramas to 360cities founder Jeffrey Martin, who then turned them into these 360-degree panoramas. It’s a stark and unsettling reminder of something that will hopefully never happen again.
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