Posts Tagged ‘panasonic’

Panasonic May Offload Sanyo Camera Business by the End of March

In yet another business move no doubt influenced by the rise of the all-mighty smartphone camera, a “source familiar with the plan” has told Reuters that Panasonic aims to sell camera and battery manufacturer Sanyo to a Japanese equity fund by the end of March.
Read more…

Strange-Looking Digital Camera Design Spotted in a Recent Panasonic Patent

Could Panasonic be planning to jump into the action camera market and compete against the likes of GoPro? A recently published US design patent suggests that it might be the case. The patent, first spotted by 43 Rumors, was filed in December of last year but published a week ago. Simply titled, “Digital Camera,” it contains a series of simple illustrations showing what appears to be a pocket-sized durable action camera.
Read more…

The Current State of the Mirrorless War

Japanese electronic industry analysis company BCN has published a new report (in Japanese) on the current landscape of the mirrorless camera industry. Using data gleaned from retailers and manufacturers over in Japan, it reports that three companies — Olympus, Sony, and Panasonic — account for nearly 70% of mirrorless camera sales in Japan. Nikon and Canon, both relatively late to the mirrorless game, are fourth and fifth (respectively), with a combined share of 22%.
Read more…

Panasonic Unveils Durable SD Cards That Can Outlive Reckless Photographers

A few days ago we shared the story of a memory card that stayed alive after three years at the bottom of a muddy creek. What’s important to note is that the card had the luxury of being protected by the Canon XT it was inside — a camera that was utterly destroyed during those three years.

What if memory cards could be as durable as the weatherproof cameras that are becoming popular amongst compact camera users? That’s what Panasonic is trying to do with its new line of sturdy SD cards.
Read more…

Panasonic Announces G5 Mirrorless and Slew of Compact Cameras

It looks like the massive Panasonic leak we reported on yesterday was like garden vs fire hose when you compare it to the announcement spree that the company went on today. In addition to the the Lumix DMC-G5 mirrorless camera that we had the most details on yesterday, Panasonic also announced five new compacts including the FZ200 superzoom and high-end LX7 compact. Read more…

Hong Kong Model May Lose Millions for Leaking Panasonic Camera on Instagram

Hong Kong model Angelababy lost her contract with Panasonic after leaking a photo of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF5 on Instagram in March of this year. And now: a legal mess that could cost millions.

China News reports that Panasonic is seeking a refund of their contract, worth 9,910,014 yuan (about $1,559,181.51 USD) plus another million yuan ($157,334 USD) in damages for the leak: a serious trade secret violation that Panasonic also said would affect their marketing plans and strategies. The ad agency in charge of the Panasonic campaign, McCann Shanghai, countersued Panasonic, saying the terminated contract is unlawful and the terms of their contract were met.

(via DPreview)


Image credit: Photograph by Crossroads Foundation Photos

Panasonic May Be Working on a Sensor with a “Built-In Graduated Filter”

A new Panasonic patent uncovered earlier by Egami shows some exciting new sensor technology that may be heading our way soon. The new tech allows for the exposure values to be adjusted for each individual row of pixels. Essentially, the sensor could automatically apply a graduated ND filter to your images without the need for an actual filter. Read more…

Olympus Paying Out $15.4M to Former Chief, No Help Coming From Panasonic

A couple of weeks ago, reports confirmed that Olympus ex-CEO Michael Woodford would be settling with his former employer out of court rather than taking them to task for his unfair dismissal. Woodford was let go after blowing the whistle on Olympus’ financial scandal, but now it seems he will have the last laugh as The New York Times has finally put a figure to the settlement: $15.4 Million.

To make matters worse for the financially unstable Olympus, previous rumors that Panasonic would be investing in the company and becoming its biggest shareholder are being flatly denied by president Fumio Ohtsubo. That doesn’t mean Olympus isn’t still searching for an investor, but Panasonic — who just days ago seemed like Olympus’ knight in shining armor — is definitely out.

(via The New York Times and Reuters)


Image credit: Brand Reflection by J-Rod85

Panasonic To Pump $635 Million Into Floundering Olympus

Due in large part to the massive accounting scandal that Olympus found itself in at the end of last year, the company hasn’t been doing that great financially. And now, according to Reuters, Panasonic is preparing to jump to Olympus’ aid by providing approximately 50 billion yen (635 million dollars) in capital. The move will benefit both parties, as Panasonic, who are struggling with sub-par TV sales, will become top shareholder in the company and hopefully add a new stream of revenue to their portfolio.

Even though, at this point, nothing has been confirmed by either company, Olympus has already reaped benefits from the rumored deal. According to Bloomberg, once the news broke, Olympus’ stock rose as much as 3.5 percent and began trading at the highest value the company has seen since March 30th.

(via Photo Rumors via Reuters)

Why Your Digital Camera’s GPS Might Not Work in China

It’s strange to think that cartography laws could somehow affect the functionality of your camera overseas, but a recent article on Ogle Earth points out that just such a thing has been going on with GPS-enabled cameras as far back as 2010. The whole “investigation” into the matter began with the release of the Panasonic TS4 earlier this year. For some reason the press release cautioned that the GPS in the camera “may not work in China or in the border regions of countries neighboring China.”

But after doing some digging they discovered that these restrictions are not limited to the TS4, nor are they even limited to Panasonic. In fact, many major manufacturers go to great lengths to conceal or toss away the location data captured by GPS-enabled cameras when you’re taking photos in the People’s Republic of China. Read more…