Posts Tagged ‘paint’

Photographs of “Invisible Man” Blending into Beijing Locations

After his Beijing studio was destroyed in 2005, artist Liu Bolin (AKA “The Invisible Man”) began a project titled “Hiding in the City” that show him blending into various locations around Beijing. The photographs aren’t Photoshopped — Bolin carefully has his body painted to blend in with each landscape. TIME writes,

Each image requires meticulous planning and execution: as both artist and performer, Bolin directs the photographer on how to compose each scene before entering the frame. Once situated, he puts on his Chinese military uniform, which he wears for all of his Invisible Man photographs, and, with the help of an assistant and painter, is painted seamlessly into the scene. This process can sometimes take up to ten hours with Bolin having to stand perfectly still. Although the end result of Bolin’s process is the photograph, the tension between his body and the landscape is itself a manifestation of China’s incredible social and physical change. [#]

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Camera Lenses with Custom Paint Jobs

A week ago we published a tongue-in-cheek post on how to improve the quality of your Canon kit lens by painting a red ring around it. While that wasn’t intended to be taken seriously, we were pointed to a Korean workshop named Park in Style that actually takes custom lens body work quite seriously. What you see above is a Canon 18-55mm kit lens that they disassembled, painted, and then reassembled to look like a Canon L lens!
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Sound Painting Photographs with Paint and Speakers

Photographer Martin Klimas, whose porcelain figurine photos we shared yesterday, has a series of photographs that look like 3D Jackson Pollock paintings. He spent six months photographing portraits of sound by playing music through a speaker that’s crowned with paint. Klimas dials up the volume and then photographs the paint coming alive from vibrations caused by the sound waves.
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Canon 50mm f/1.8 “Nifty Fifty” Painted to Look Like a White L Lens

Here’s something you’ve probably never seen before: a white “L” version of the cheap Canon 50mm f/1.8 (AKA the “nifty fifty”). No, it’s not an uber-rare and expensive special edition. It’s a custom paint job by Clubsnap forum member nntenzo. After painting the lens with paint mixed from three $1 tubes, he used a laser printer and decal paper to add the lettering and decals back onto the lens. The resulting lens is one that will definitely befuddle any Canonite who happens to catch a glimpse of it… It’s a conversation starter for sure.

50mm f1.8 L (white colour) (via DigitalRev)

Portrait Photos ‘Printed’ Onto Abandoned Buildings by Scratching Off Paint

Artist Alexandre Farto has an interesting method of ‘printing’ large scale portrait photographs onto walls. Instead of using paint, he scratches paint away. Starting with a guide painted onto the wall using a stencil, Farto carefully scratches and chips paint and plaster away from walls using a jackhammer, pick, hammer, and his hands. His giant photos can be seen on abandoned buildings in cities around the world, including Moscow, London, and NYC.
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Red is the New Black? Nikon Goes Colorful with the D3100

DSLRs are finding their way into more and more consumers’ hands, and apparently many of those consumers are tired of the standard black look. Just months after Canon announced the Rebel T3 in red, Nikon is following suit with its entry level D3100 — the first Nikon DSLR to be available in a color other than black or silver. Aside from the new paint job, the camera’s specs are identical to the black version.

Nikon D3100 (via Nikon Rumors)

You Can Now Make Your Leica as Ugly as a Pentax Special Edition DSLR

Gadget painting company ColorWare is now offering its services for the Leica D-Lux 5, allowing you to choose custom colors for everything from the body to the hot shoe insert. If you’ve always wanted to make your D-Lux as painful on the eyes as some of Pentax’s limited edition cameras, now’s your chance. You can buy a custom painted $800 D-Lux directly from ColorWare for $1200, or send in your camera for a $400 paint job. It’s super pricey, but if you’re shooting with a Leica and even thinking about a custom paint job, then price probably isn’t one of your concerns.

ColorWare – Leica D-Lux 5 (via Engadget)

Jumping Out of One’s Skin with Creative Light Painting

This is one of the most creative examples of light painting we’ve seen — Flickr user Janne Parviainen created this unique light painting photograph to show a skeleton jumping out of a body. It’s straight from the camera without any Photoshop trickery.


Image credit: Serotonia by jannepaint and used with permission

Making Paint Dance in Slow Motion Using Sound Waves

Dentsu London, the same ad agency that recently experimented with iPad light-painting, was recently hired by Canon to create a commercial for the Canon Pixma line of printers. They decided to create super close-up and super slow-mo shots of paint dancing by using sound, and created a rig that spins around the paint super fast to create a sense of motion as they shoot at 5000 fps. As you’ll see from the video, this is a great idea for still photos as well.

The resulting commercial can be seen at the end of the video. It’s stunning.

(via f stoppers)

How Not to Paint Your Nikon D90 Pink

Kai at DigitalRev was recently given the challenge of painting a Nikon D90 pink magenta. He chooses to dismantle the camera in order to paint individual components, but works on it as carefully as one would work on a steak. At one point he even gets an electric shock from the components, though we’re wondering why he didn’t simply remove the battery. The camera miraculously looks somewhat normal in the end, but several parts are broken in the process (LCD won’t turn on, and popup flash wont’ go down).

What’s interesting is that he takes the pink camera to the Nikon headquarters along with a hidden camera. His interaction with the customer service there is quite hilarious.

Here’s the video of the whole “adventure”. It’s a bit long, and might anger you, but you get to see the internals of a Nikon D90 if you find that sort of thing interesting!

So anyhow, painting your camera like this is definitely something to be avoided. If you’ve successfully painted your camera without breaking it, leave a comment letting us know!

(via PopPhoto)