Posts Tagged ‘organize’

LenzBuddy: Custom Lens and Body Caps for Branding and Ease of Use

caps

Lens and camera body caps aren’t usually very informative or personalized, and LenzBuddy wants to change that. The Dallas, Texas-based business sells custom lens caps that help photographers both add branding to their gear and find lenses in their bags more quickly.
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Trash or Keep: Flic Uses Tinder Swipe Interface to Help You Organize Your iOS Photos

Screen Shot 2014-10-03 at 1.30

Sorting through the hundreds (if not thousands) of photos on your smartphone can be a daunting task, but a new iOS called Flic is out to make the task seem much more manageable. How much more manageable? About as manageable as swiping through ‘matches’ on the ‘dating’ app Tinder.
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Turn a Sunstar Soft-Picks Case into a DIY SD Card Holder

Wanting a cheap and compact way to carry, protect, and manage his SD cards, Instructables member FrankenPaper discovered that the plastic cases that come with Sunstar GUM Soft-Picks are the perfect size for holding 2 cards. To keep the cards from jostling around and to track whether they’re full or empty, he created an insert that you can print, cut, and fold yourself (download the PDF here).

SD card case [Instructables]

Add a Clip to Lens Caps to Make Them Easier to Hold On To

Have a habit of losing your lens caps? Add a clip to them to keep them attached to your camera strap when not in use! All you need are a lapel clip — the kind found on old wired cellphone headsets work great — and some strong mounting tape. It’s basically a DIY version of the Nice Clip, which we featured back in October.

(via Sean Michael Ragan via Make)


Image credits: Photographs by Sean Michael Ragan

Adobe Pixel Nuggets: Search Your Photo Library for Similar Features

Adobe’s amazing Image Deblurring demo was the star of the Sneak Peeks event at Adobe MAX 2011, but it was just one of the many demos shown that night. Another interesting photography-related demo was for “Pixel Nuggets”: a feature that lets you search a large library of photos for features (e.g. people, landmarks, patterns, logos).
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Use Toilet Paper Rolls to Organize Cables

Like many electronic devices, cameras often come with certain cables that are neither necessary enough to be used often nor useless enough to be tossed into the trash. A neat trick for keeping them organized and away from other cables is to stick them into toilet paper rolls. You can even go a step further by making a DIY cable organizer using a shoe box, which makes finding a particular cable a breeze.

TP Roll Organizer Box (via Lifehacker)


Image credits: Photographs by berserk

Organize Your Camera Collection with Some Chalk

At Levi’s Photo Workshop in New York City last year there was a large collection of cameras sitting on shelves and available for anyone to use. To keep track of what was missing, labels and outlines were drawn on the wall to “carve out” little homes for the cameras. If you have a sizable camera collection, labeling your walls could be a neat way to both organize them and show them off!


Image credit: Cameras for Public Use at Levis Workshop by Shawn Hoke Photography

Organize and Rename Your Photos Based on EXIF Data

AmoK Exif Sorter is a program written for photographers obsessed with organization, allowing a collection of photographs to be renamed and organized based on the EXIF data embedded in each photo. In addition to the obvious choices for details to include in the file name (e.g. time and date), you can also use any other piece of EXIF info you wish, including things like camera model, aperture, ISO, and shutter speed. For organization, the program allows you to copy or move files into whatever folder structure you’d like (i.e. /year/month/day/image.jpg). The program is free, Java-based, and can be downloaded here.

AmoK Exif Sorter (via Lifehacker)

SortMyPhotostream Brings Chronological Order to Your Flickr Chaos

SortMyPhotostream is a tool that most Flickr users will have no use for, but one that some might find invaluable. It all depends on whether you would like your Flickr photos’ upload dates to reflect the day they were actually taken. For example, if you’re doing a Project 365 and would like each photo to show up on the day it was taken in your calendar view, then this app can help you make that happen.

All you do is give the app permission to access your Flickr account, and it automatically changes the “Uploaded on” date of each photo to the “Created on” date found in the EXIF data. If this isn’t the kind of thing you need, don’t play around with the app — changes made by it are permanent.

Cable Management with Tennis Balls

We found and shared a pretty useful tip a while ago that involved organizing loose cables with binder clips. I switched to a new desk recently, and found myself with the messy cable problem:

The cables had to be pulled somewhat far into the desk to prevent them from slipping into the crack between the desk and the wall. I tried using binder clips, but my desk is too thick for them to be attached.

Look around for another solution, I decided to try using some old tennis balls. I have quite a few lying around the house from the glory days of high school tennis. Here’s what I used:

The small screwdriver set and scissors are simply used to cut holes into opposites sides of each tennis ball. There’s probably other (and easier) ways of doing this, but a box cutter didn’t work for me.

Puncture the tennis ball using progressively larger screwdrivers until the hole is large enough to shove the scissor blade into. Then cut or tear a hole using the scissors.

Create a coin sized hole in both sides of the tennis ball, with the slits lined up. This allows an opening to be created in the tennis ball when it’s squeezed:

Thread each cable through a tennis ball, and voila! They can be neatly stored at the edge of the table without falling into the crack:

When you need to use a cable, you can simply pull it through the tennis ball while leaving it pressed against the wall. This helps you avoid having tennis balls scattered all over your desk:

Yay for organization and efficiency! Do you have any personal tips for organizing your cables?