Posts Tagged ‘oregon’

Wedding Photos Use Wildfire as a Unique Backdrop and Go Viral

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This last weekend, photographer Josh Newton created some of the most memorable wedding photos we have ever seen. Set against the backdrop of a raging wildfire, Newton’s dramatic, striking photographs of April Hartley and Michael Wolber’s outdoor wedding are sweeping across the Internet today at an unbelievable clip. Read more…

‘Spinning Mountain’ Hyperlapse Makes You Feel Like You’re Flying Around Mt. Hood

Kevin Parry and Andrea Nesbitt of Candy Glass Productions have a thing for creating ‘spinning’ hyperlapses that make you feel like you’re flying around a landmark at super-speed. But while they’ve taken on landmarks like the CN tower and a few notable San Francisco locations before, they recently took their craft to the next level when they decided to ‘spin’ an entire mountain. (Note: Spinning mountain starts at 1:15 in the video above). Read more…

Double Exposures of Nature Blooming Through Portraits of Young Women

Buried inside photographer Jon Duenas‘ extensive portfolio are a set of double exposures that seem to focus on the theme of nature blooming through portraits of young women. Sometimes the technique itself is novel; such was the case with the mix of light paining and bullet time we posted yesterday. But that doesn’t mean that a photography technique that has been used time and again can’t still produce fresh, unique, and inspirational results. Case in point: Read more…

A Time-Lapse Journey Through Oregon

Here’s an amazing time-lapse video that was made using time-lapse photography shot over six months in the beautiful state of Oregon. This interview quote by Ben Canales gives a glimpse into how much dedication this kind of project requires:

The actual filming takes 2-4 hours to record a good night time-lapse of the stars moving, and then pack up, hike out, and drive home the next day. That is only the work done in the field! Then there are hours and hours of processing, editing, and polishing the final video sequence to get only six seconds of final video.

It is not an exaggeration to say one short, final clip may represent 20-30 hours of planning, driving, hiking, shooting, and processing — all that for mere seconds of video playback. It is a ridiculous labor of love.

Hundreds of hours of work for a four-minute video that has already been viewed over a hundred thousand times. Be sure to watch it full screen and in HD!