Posts Tagged ‘opportunity’

10 Best Cities for Working Photographers in the US

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You carry a camera everywhere because you just never know when something or someone worthy of having its picture taken will appear. You also work plenty of weddings and events, or you may be a photo journalist for a newspaper. You are a photographer, and are always on the lookout for beauty. But what makes a city good for a working photographer? While it’s important that there are plenty things to photograph, these statistics are equally relevant as well. Read more…

‘Jelly Donut’ Rock Mysteriously Appears in Mars Rover Photo of Same Spot Days Apart

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The Mars Opportunity Rover has found a jelly donut on Mars… man would that be an awesome headline. Unfortunately we couldn’t run that unless we were intent on click baiting you (we’re not…). What the 10-year-veteran Mars Rover did find (and photograph) is a mysterious rock that looks like — and has been nicknamed — the ‘jelly donut.’

Why mysterious? Because it seemed to appear out of nowhere in pictures of the exact same spot on the Martian ground only 12 Martian days (or Sols) apart. Read more…

Mars Rover Opportunity Commemorates 10 Years on Mars by Sending Home a Selfie

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When the Mars Rover Opportunity landed on our planetary neighbor on January 25th, 2004 it was undertaking a three-month mission. Well, it’s a full decade later and the little guy is still alive and kickin’ (in a robotic kind of way).

And what better way to celebrate that achievement then by taking a good ol’ fashioned, 2014-like selfie? Read more…

What Causes Photographers to Miss Golden Photo Opportunities?

Every photographer probably has at least one story of a photo opportunity they missed simply because they decided not to press the shutter. Photographs Not Taken is a new book by photographer Will Steacy that offers 62 stories told by photographers around the world about moments that never became photographs. Sean O’Hagan of The Guardian writes that the decision is often an ethical one:

Consider the story related by Sylvia Plachy who, on a street in midtown Manhattan just after the twin towers of the World Trade Centre had collapsed on 9/11, encountered a dust-covered man “who had walked though hell”. He was, says Plachy, “the icon” of the human tragedy. Many people took his photograph. She did not. “I would have had to step in front of him, interrupt his frantic pace,” she writes. “I felt ashamed. I hesitated. I questioned. It didn’t seem right. In an instant he was gone. I didn’t do it.”

Plachy spent the following fortnight roaming the streets of downtown New York looking for another picture as powerful as the one she had not taken. “His image haunts me to this day,” she writes, adding ruefully, “Diane Arbus would have done it.”

This story, it seems to me, gets to the heart of the matter. Many photographers share Arbus’s view that you take the picture whatever the cost – to yourself as well as the subject. I have always been uncomfortable with that notion. It says that nothing is too intimate, too private. It insists, too, on the primacy of the photograph over the experience.

If you have your own stories of times when you couldn’t bring yourself to press the shutter, please share it with us in the comments!

Photographs Not Taken (via The Guardian)


Image credit: Empty Frames by THEfunkyman

London Gallery to Showcase Flickr Photos

theprintspace, a photo gallery in London, has announced a summer group exhibition comprised entirely of Flickr photographs, allowing up-and-coming photographers a chance on the big scene.

Four photographs will be selected each month from theprintspace’s Flickr pool by a different industry professional. The guest judge for March, World Press Photography Award-winning photojournalist Laura Pannack, says,

This is a fantastic opportunity for photographers to have their work exhibited and brilliant that theprintspace is lending its space to the best of amateur photography on Flickr. The lack of restrictions on the competition opens up a world of diverse photography, from photographers of all ages, with no distinct theme or genre. We can look forward to discovering some hidden gems.

If you’ve never had work shown in a gallery before, why not give this a shot?

(via PhotographyBLOG)