Posts Tagged ‘olympics’

A Peek Inside the Camera Bag of a Getty Photographer at the Olympics

What would you pack in your camera bag to shoot the biggest sporting event in the world? PopPhoto has a great interview with Getty photographer Streeter Lecka in which he talks about preparing for (and shooting) the Olympics in London. His daily-basis kit includes two Canon 1D Xs, a 400mm f/2.8, two 70-200mm (f/2.8 and f/4), a 16-35mm f/2.8, and a 15mm fisheye. Here’s how his images are beamed to headquarters:

Getty has our own lines that are hardwired into every single event. Our tech crew came over months before to get an idea of where we’d be shooting. We can just plug in and send from there. The editors are in the media center where they can send it out immediately.

I have a backpack everyday with a computer and a card reader. When I plug it into the wire, push in the card, and press start, it automatically sends everything to the editors. Everything transfers to my computer as well. I also bring a separate little hard drive so I can back up everything I shoot for myself. If I want an original RAW file, I can get it if I want to.

Lecka says he expects to snap 2,000-4,000 photos a day on average.

Shooting The Olympics: Inside The Camera Bag Of Getty Photographer Streeter Lecka [PopPhoto]

Bad Olympic Portraits Rewarded with an Exhibition in NYC

You know the expression, “there is no such thing as bad publicity”? It’s certainly true in the case of Joe Klamar’s “bad” Olympic portraits. After getting the Internet talking about (and criticizing) the images earlier this month, Joe Klamar has been given an exhibition in NYC at the Powerhouse Arena. Here’s the description of the show:

Many of the photographs were first met with harsh criticism from a bevy of news sites and photo blogs quick to highlight the images’ alleged defects—citing the off-hand poses, the stressed lighting, the scarred backdrops—and labeled the work an affront to the elite status of the American Olympic athletic team.

Such criticisms miss the work’s powerful and nuanced compositions and display of personality. Here we see real individuals at the peak of their athletic career in ordinary and impromptu poses, sometimes playful, some quite intense, in an unplanned setting. You will not see world-class athletes like this anywhere.

The exhibition is set to kick off on July 27th to coincide with the London Olympics.


Image credits: Photographs by Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images

The Fancy Robotic DSLR Rigs Covering the Olympic Games

This behind-the-scenes video by the Associated Press gives a neat look at the various robotic cameras the agency will use at the London Olympic Games (earlier this month we shared some of Reuters’ rigs). Fancy remote-controlled rigs will allow for many photographic firsts, as cameras will be found in locations that were previously inaccessible. Wired writes that despite their usefulness, robotic cameras are causing some human photogs to sweat:

“We are essentially able to put cameras and photographers where they’ve never been before, capturing images in ways they’ve never been captured,” [Fabrizio] Bensch said. “For example, I’ve installed a robotic camera unit on a truss, 30 meters high — in a position where no photographer has been in a previous Olympics.”

For [Mark] Reblias, those are positions you just can’t compete against. With the traditional remote-control cameras, if the subject showed untethered joy five feet out of frame, you were out of luck. Now if Reuters is able to get that shot, “well, there’s nothing I can do,” he said. “Maybe I’ll have to upgrade my gear and make a robotic system. It’d be expensive, it might be a cost I have to take on.”

Robo-Cams at the Olympic Games Make Human Photogs Sweat [Wired]

Portraits of Olympic Athletes with Their Daily Meal Intakes

World class athletes eat huge meals to provide their bodies with fuel during training (you might have heard that swimmer Michael Phelps gobbles down 12,000 calories every day while training). Reuters photographer Umit Bektas recently decided to do a photo project exploring this fact by shooting studio portraits of Turkish Olympic athletes posing next to tables laden with their daily meal intakes.
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Behind the Scenes at a Paralympic Photo Shoot

Capturing photos of our Olympic and Paralympic athletes is an important job that no photographer takes lightly — after all, we’ve all seen the kind of firestorm that can result from not doing it well. So when Benjamin Von Wong had the opportunity to photograph Olympic Para Dressage Rider Natasha Baker, he made sure to do it right.

This behind the scenes video shows how he went about planning, lighting and executing the three shots that he was after. Fortunately, all the work seems to have paid off: the final three images capture three unique (and uniquely great) sides to Natasha Baker and the sport she competes in at the world class level.

(via N-Photo)

Reuters to Use Robotic DSLR Cameras for Olympic Coverage

Sports photographers use a variety of techniques and gear to shoot from different angles that are less accessible to the photographers during action: wirelessly triggered cameras mounted behind backboards, perched on overhead catwalks, clamped on the ground. Reuters photographers Fabrizio Bensch and Pawel Kopczynski decided to take the technology of remote photography to another level for the upcoming 2012 Summer Olympics with robotic cameras.
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MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Olympic Committee Clarifies Photography Rules for London 2012

A month ago, quite a bit of controversy was stirred up when Amateur Photographer pointed out some stringent and seemingly unenforceable restrictions included in the London 2012 Ticker Holder Agreement. Initially it seemed that attendees might have been prevented from posting images to social networks (an assumption which was later refuted). But even though attendees will be allowed to post images to Facebook to their heart’s content, amateurs and non-media who wanted to get some commercial-grade pictures of the Olympic events are still out of luck. Read more…

World Photo Games: A Humorous Fusion of Photography and the Olympics

Canadian camera shop The Camera Store are the masters of viral photography-related ads (they’re the ones behind the Battle at F-Stop Ridge and its sequel). Now, with the Olympics just around the corner, they’ve released this humorous new video showing an imaginary “2012 World Photo Games” in which photo gear is used for Olympic sports.

London Olympics’ Photo Policy Not as Draconian as It Sounds

Amateur Photographer sparked an outcry among photographers this past Tuesday after it pointed out a section in the London Olympics’ ticketholder policies that states:

Images, video and sound recordings of the Games taken by a Ticket Holder cannot be used for any purpose other than for private and domestic purposes and a Ticket Holder may not license, broadcast or publish video and/or sound recordings, including on social networking websites and the internet more generally, and may not exploit images, video and/or sound recordings for commercial purposes under any circumstances, whether on the internet or otherwise, or make them available to third parties for commercial purposes.

Shortly after we reported on the story yesterday, a spokesman for the Olympics organizing committee (Locog) issued a response stating that they “are not looking to stop private individuals from posting photographs on social networks,” and that the intent is to prevent photos being used for commercial purposes. He did, however, acknowledge that the wording is unclear, saying that it will likely be clarified when tickets are mailed.

(via Amateur Photographer via TheDigitalVisual)


Image credits: Image by London 2012

London Olympics Won’t Allow Sharing of Photos and Video via Social Networks

Photographers have already lodged complaints against the security firm that tried to prevent them from taking photos of the Olympic sites from public land, but it seems that even stricter rules will be imposed on ticket holders once the games begin. According to a freelance photographer named Peter Ruck, the Olympic organizing committee Locog intends to prevent attendees from uploading images and videos captured at the games to social networks.
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