Posts Tagged ‘olympics’

What if Every Olympic Sport Was Photographed Like Beach Volleyball?

Nate Jones over at Metro was recently looking through Getty Images in search of Olympic beach volleyball photos, when he came upon an interesting/”gross” discovery: some of the photographs focused on the body rather than the athlete or the sport. While other Olympic sport photos focus on action and emotion, it seems that certain beach volleyball photographers are intent on snapping images of behinds.

That got Jones thinking, “what if every Olympic sport was photographed like women’s beach volleyball?” He then decided to take other shots of other sports and crop them through the lens of volleyball photographers. Here’s a sampling of the hilarious images.
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Photojournalist Uses iPhone to Cover Olympics

We’ve seen some very heavy-duty gear lugged out to cover the Olympic games in London this year: some robotic rigs, an 800mm lens that could easily weigh more than the average lady gymnast, and of course, the usual suspects in a packed camera bag. But Guardian photojournalist Dan Chung is traveling light: he’s covering the games with a simple iPhone setup.

Using different combinations of an iPhone 4s, a clip-on Schneider lens and a pair of Canon binoculars, Chung has been live-blogging all aspects of the games. His photos yield surprisingly crisp results, indoors, outdoors and even underwater through a viewing window — which again reinforces the old photographer’s adage that the best camera is the one that’s with you.

Chung uses the Snapseed app to do in-camera/phone edits. You can check out more of Chung’s work on his Guardian blog.

(via The Verge via dpreview)

Olympics Photographer Caught Having Lens Cap Dysfunction

A photographer at the London 2012 Olympics was spotted by a television camera making an embarrassing mistake that’s usually limited to newbies: forgetting to remove the lens cap. As he tries to photograph Japanese gymnast Kohei Uchimura using his DSLR’s live view, the photographer notices that his LCD screen is strangely blank. After a short period of befuddlement, he realizes the errors of his ways, quickly corrects it, and casts a classic sidelong glance to see if any of his photographer buddies were secretly laughing at him.

We shared a similar video last year, but that photographer had more of an excuse: he was shooting with a rangefinder.

(via Reddit)

Olympic Basketball Photog on Becoming Part of the Story After Crash

Sports photographers sitting close to the action occasionally take a beating when athletes leave their field of play. This happened yesterday to Reuters photographer Mike Segar while he was shooting the Olympic basketball game between Spain and Australia. While trying to dive for a loose ball, Spain’s Rudy Fernandez slammed into Segar and injured his head. Segar has written up an interesting post on what it was like to suddenly find the cameras pointed at him:

As the smoke cleared and I looked up, Fernandez was basically lying in my lap head down eyes closed. He rolled forward slightly, moved his hands to his head, moaned loudly and stopped moving. He was in my lap, clearly injured on his head. I could see blood on his fingers on top of his head and apparently he was now unconscious for a few seconds, or nearly so. At this point I was not a photographer. I suppose I just kind of instinctively rubbed his arm and shoulder, kept my hands on his back and held him a bit and said “stay still, stay still man… You’re all right.” I didn’t actually know if he WAS all right at all, but all I could do was to try to comfort him for the 20 or 30 seconds it took the Spain trainers, players and staff to rush to his aid. Anyone would do the same for anyone else injured in their lap, right?

I looked up and realized that fellow photographers and TV crews were shooting the incident from all possible angles. I was in the center of this wreckage but I was not really hurt. A camera with a wide angle lens was somewhere in the strewn mess of my equipment at my side and for a moment I thought to try to find it and take pictures, but with Fernandez lying bleeding on my feet and me the only one trying to help a bit, that wasn’t going to happen.

Photographer in focus with courtside crash [Reuters]


Image credits: Photographs by Christian Petersen/Getty Images, Richard Mackson/USA TODAY, Richard Mackson/USA TODAY, and Eric Gay/Associated Press (clockwise from top left)

Photographer Shares His Experience with the Nikon 800mm f/5.6

Nikon’s massive 800mm f/5.6 super-telephoto lens hasn’t been launched yet, but English press photographer Leon Neal was given the enviable opportunity to play around with a pre-release copy at the London Olympic Games. After shooting two sessions at the aquatics center with the beastly piece of glass, Neal published a blog post with some sample photos and thoughts on how the lens performs:

The shot above is an unsharpened 100% crop of the frame below with no noise reduction applied. As you can see, not only has the lens done a pretty good job of tracking but the D4 has provided good results at 4000ISO. Image stabilisation seemed subtle with no obvious “clunk” as it kicked in like some lenses. The only discernible giveaway was the soft purr of the IS motor disengaging after I took my finger off the trigger. Likewise, the effect of the stabilisation was equally subtle with only a barely noticeable delay when looking through the viewfinder at a subject.

Head on over to Neal’s blog to read his short review.

Nikon 800mm f5.6 preview (via Nikon Rumors)


Image credits: Photographs by Leon Neal

Photos Documenting the Illegal Use of Olympic Branding

The 2012 London Olympics is pretty strict about how the Games’ branding is used, prohibiting the unauthorized use of everything from the Olympic symbol to the word “Olympic”. Enforcing the rules is another story, as businesses both near and far use Olympic branding extensively to promote their own interests. Photographer Craig Atkinson recently decided to start a project documenting illegal uses in London through a photo project titled Illegal Olympics.
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London Olympic Photographs from Over 100 Years Ago

The Olympic games in London this year makes London the first city to have hosted the modern Olympic Games three times. The previous times were in 1908 and 1948. Here are some photographs captured at the 1908 Olympics 104 years ago, during a time when megaphones were used to announce events, top hats were all the rage, and dresses were worn by female competitors (this was the third games in which women were allowed to compete).
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Canon’s Drool-Worthy Gear Room at the London Olympics

Canon Olympics Camera Gear Room

Welcome to camera gear heaven: here’s a glimpse inside the Canon Professional Services office at the London 2012 Olympics. It’s a room that’s absolutely stuffed with cameras, lenses, and accessories from floor to ceiling. The Canon 1D X hasn’t been released to the general public yet, but this room has hundreds of them!
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Olympic Opening Ceremony Participant Captures Inside View with Hidden Camera

Update: The video is no longer available. Apparently the Olympic Committee is cracking down on unauthorized videos.


Want to see what it was like to be a participant in the opening ceremony of the London Olympics? One 26-year-old participant decided to build a hidden camera into his/her costume, capturing this awesome footage showing a performer’s perspective of the show.

Reuters’ Underwater Camera for Shooting Olympic Swimmers

Here’s a brief video in which Reuters shows off the special underwater camera it created to shoot swimming competitions at the London Olympics. The design was derived from the cameras used during the BP oil spill back in 2010.