Posts Tagged ‘npr’

Photo Collector Robert E. Jackson on the Death of the Snapshot

Robert E. Jackson isn’t exactly a household name, but his massive collection of one-of-a-kind snapshots has earned him a great deal of recognition in the right circles. Back in 2007, he was given an entire show at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. And some of his collection is currently on display at the Pace/MacGill Gallery in New York City.

He’s a prolific collector with over 11,000 prints to his name, and so NPR’s Claire O’Neill asked him to call in and talk with her about the snapshot, what it was, what it is, and whether or not it’s in the process of fading away forever. Read more…

Band Helps NPR Move Its ‘Tiny Desk’ and Makes an Epic Music Video in the Process

It took 223 takes, 8 hard-boiled eggs, 5 microphones, 2 days and 1 camera, but Bob Boilen’s Tiny Desk — which is featured in the Boilen-created Tiny Desk Concert series on NPR Music — has officially been moved to NPR’s new headquarters.

Why did it take so much video? Because Boilen decided to film a Tiny Desk Concert featuring the band OK Go during the move, producing the above music/moving video in the process. Read more…

Some Airlines Saying ‘No’ to Onboard Photography

americanair0

Most people in today’s society have a mobile phone. Most mobile phones have cameras. Anyone and everyone has become an on-the-scene photojournalist, reporting on everything from major news events to the odd and crazy.

Some of these picture-worthy events take place on everyday flights. Shutter-happy passengers, snapping or even video recording the woman on the next aisle over acting unusual or a fellow passenger being disruptive. It’s undeniable that we are curious beings, and want to document and share events we witness. But not everyone is pleased citizen photojournalists.
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Hear What It’s Like to Serve as an Official White House Photographer

As a followup to our post earlier today about former White House photographer Eric Draper’s work, here’s an interesting and relevant 17-minute-long story that aired on NPR in January of this year. It’s an interview with former presidential photographers Eric Draper and Robert McNeely, who photographed the presidencies of George W. Bush and Bill Clinton (respectively).
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Photo of Woman Praying Causes Debate About Photojournalism and Privacy

newtown_prayer

NPR sparked a debate regarding photojournalism, ethics, and privacy this past Monday after publishing a story titled, “What It Feels Like To Be Photographed In A Moment Of Grief” on its photography blog.

The discussion revolved around the photograph above, which AFP photographer Emmanuel Dunand captured in the evening after the school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut.
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The “Back to the Future” Photography of Irina Werning

Argentinian photographer Irina Werning’s “Back to the Future” series of photographs features people reenacting photographs of themselves taken decades ago, and has made Werning a well-known photographer after going viral on the Internet over the past year.

I love old photos. I admit being a nosey photographer. As soon as I step into someone else’s house, I start sniffing for them. Most of us are fascinated by their retro look but to me, it’s imagining how people would feel and look like if they were to reenact them today… A few months ago, I decided to actually do this. So, with my camera, I started inviting people to go back to their future. [#]

NPR created the behind-the-scenes video above in which Werning talks about her interesting project.

Back to the Future (via Fstoppers)

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Turn Your Halloween Pumpkin into a Pinhole Camera

Claire O’Neill and Mito Habe-Evans over at NPR’s The Picture Show blog have just posted a fun experimental project you can try out this halloween: making a pinhole camera out of a pumpkin. What you’ll need is a pumpkin, aluminum foil, a knife, tape, photo paper, dark spray paint, and access to a dark room. Along with the disturbing skull camera we shared earlier today, this would be a fun way to capture photos of trick-or-treaters this halloween.
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