Posts Tagged ‘novel’

Glow Graffiti Lets You Light Paint with an Aerosol Can

Glow Graffiti is an aerosol can-style light painting tool similar to the one by artist Aïssa Logerot that we featured back in September. It’s powered by a UV light rather than the interchangeable LED lights used by Logerot, but the Glow Graffiti comes with a special UV-sensitive backdrop on which paintings are visible for around 30 seconds (the kit contains letter stencils too). You can pick up a set for $39 from Photojojo or Amazon (it’s prime eligible).

Glow Graffiti Toolset (via PhotoWeeklyOnline)

The Eatery: A Photo App That Aims to Change the Way You Eat

The Eatery is a new “photo sharing” app that’s focused more on health than photography. Instead of being judged on aesthetics photographs are rated based on whether people think the food is healthy or not. Your “photo habits” are also crunched and turned into useful infographics and statistics about how and when you eat, giving you helpful information that you can use to change your eating habits.
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Unique Earrings Crafted From 35mm Film

Brussels-based jewelry designer Clement Marquaire creates one-of-a-kind earrings using old 35mm film. A pair will cost you $15 over in Marquaire’s Esty store.

Happy Factory Etsy Store (via Photojojo)

Melbourne’s Chinatown Photographed with a Roast Duck

Nine years ago, during his final year as a fine art photography student in Melbourne, Martin Cheung came up with a strange idea: seeing how roast duck was a symbol of Chinese cooking, he wanted to see how the duck saw Melbourne’s Chinatown. He then bought a roast duck, turned it into a pinhole camera, and — after a couple of failures and adjustments — used it to photograph Melbourne’s Chinatown gate. You can find more info on the project (and a step-by-step guide on making your own roast duck camera) over on Cheung’s website.

How a Roast Duck Sees Chinatown [URBANPHOTO]

3D Photo Sculptures of People Made with Hundreds of Prints

Korean artist Gwon Osang makes creative photo sculptures by photographing subjects, making hundreds of prints, and then plastering the photos onto a styrofoam sculture. Photographing the body takes up to half a day to complete, and Osang carves the sculptures himself since his background is in sculpture rather than photography. Each piece takes one to two months to complete.
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Minority Report-style Interface for Viewing Gigapixel Photos

Gigalinc is an “immersive photography” project by University of Lincoln student Samuel Cox that allows people to explore gigapixel photographs on a giant display using arm movements and hand gestures. Using an Xbox Kinect sensor for motion detection and a large cinema display, the resulting user interface is strikingly similar to the interface Tom Cruise uses in Minority Report.

(via TechCrunch)

Photographer Makes “Chlorophyll Prints” Using Leaves and Sunlight

Photographer Binh Danh observed one summer that there was a difference in color between grass under a water hose and the grass directly exposed to sunlight. He then began to experiment with combining photography with photosynthesis, and came up with what he calls “chlorophyll prints” — photographs printed onto leaves using the sun.
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Pose: A Camera Case that Doubles as a Simple Stand

Pose is a camera case that doubles as a simple stand. Designed to replace the little bean bags or mini-tripods that many people carry around separately, Pose has an attachment mount built in, and can either be propped up by itself on flat surfaces or wrapped around poles and curved surfaces. The $24 accessory is available for pre-order over at quirky, and will be manufactured if at least 1,000 people join in.

AMP Camera Captures HDR Video in Real Time with One Lens and Three Sensors

Late last year we showed you an interesting demonstration of HDR video filmed using two Canon 5D Mark IIs. The cameras captured the exact same scene at different exposure values using a beam-splitter. Now, a new camera called AMP has been developed that captures real-time HDR video using a single lens. The trick is that there are two beam-splitters in the camera that take the light and direct it onto three different sensors, giving the system a dynamic range of 17 stops. Check out some sample clips in the video above — they might be pretty ugly, but the technology here is pretty interesting.
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A Digital Camera That Magically Prints onto Any Flat Surface

Swedish Alex Breton spent 11 years and and $10 million developing the PrintBrush, a printer that lets you print onto paper by simply rubbing the handheld device across the surface. While traditional printers must move paper through a machine in order to accurately track the position of the page, the PrintBrush works more like an optical mouse, tracking the paper underneath with lasers. A camera-equipped PaintBrush is set to hit the market in early 2012, letting people everywhere print photos instantly on any flat surface!