Posts Tagged ‘newyorktimes’

Pulitzer Prize-Winning Photojournalist Takes the iPhone 6 for a Spin

When the New York TimesMolly Wood received two review units of the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus from Apple, she wanted to see how they fared in the hands of a truly great photographer. So she shipped the two devices off to trusted NYT photojournalist and Pulitzer Prize winner Todd Heisler.

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Award-Winning Photographer James Estrin On Capturing the Spiritual Experiences that Underlie Everyday Life

Throughout his career as a New York Times photographer, James Estrin has capture some in credibly powerful photography.

With assignments ranging from capturing the Ground Zero memorial being opened on the one-year anniversary of 9/11, to something as seemingly mundane as capturing photos of the elderly residents who use Meals On Wheels, Estrin takes a unique approach to his photos, attempting to capture a spiritual experience in every moment of life. Read more…

On Design: Searching for a More Visual News Site

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When the Chicago Sun-Times laid off its entire photo staff last year, I commented that one of the problems was the utter failure of website design to appropriately showcase photography. Above is an example of the current design and the way photography is displayed. Read more…

NYPD Officer Faces Up To 7 Years in Jail for Lying About Photographer’s Arrest

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One year ago, in August of 2012, New York Times photographer Robert Stolarik was arrested for allegedly using his camera flash to interfere with police during an arrest. However, after taking a look at the evidence, it’s the police officer who is in hot water and may face up to 7 years in prison after being indicted on three felony counts and five misdemeanors. Read more…

New York Times Puts Instagram Image on the Front Page

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In November of 2010, The New York Times made headlines of their own when they chose four Hipstamatic photos to grace their front page. And now, Instagram is getting in on the action as well. For Sunday’s paper, the NYT decided to use a photo of Alex Rodriguez taken by photographer Nick Laham in a locker room bathroom using an iPhone and edited in Instagram. Read more…

Instagram May Soon Turn Paparazzi Into an Endangered Species

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In recent years, photographers — and particularly photojournalists — have had to compete more and more aggressively with the everyday Joe and his smartphone who happens to be at the right place at the right time. And with technologies like CrowdOptic in the works that will help sift through the plethora of photographs taken every second, news agencies may soon be able to find that Joe in record time.

But according to an article by Jenna Wortham of The New York Times, one branch of photography is already taking a significant hit: the paparazzi are being replaced by Instagrammers. Using a recent photo of Beyoncé and her daughter as an example, Wortham shows how the paparazzi are already losing their battler with those same amateurs. Read more…

The Times is Offering Photographers a Chance at a Serious Portfolio Review

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It’s safe to say that most amateur photographers have wondered at one time or another if they have what it takes to make it in the big leagues. Well, here’s their chance to find out, because The New York Times is hosting a professional portfolio review for 150 of the best amateurs courageous enough to send their work in. Read more…

Fujifilm’s Moiré-Killing X-Trans Sensor is a Throwback to the Days of Film

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Fujifilm’s new X-Trans sensors diverge from the traditional way CMOS sensors are designed by using an irregular pattern of red, green, and blue pixels. This allows the sensors to eschew the standard anti-aliasing filter, eliminating moiré patterns without putting an extra component in front of the sensor. Roy Furchgott over at The New York Times has an interesting piece on how the new tech is inspired by Fujifilm’s glory days in the film photography industry:

Old fashioned analog photographs didn’t get a moire pattern because the crystals in film and photo paper aren’t even in size and placement. That randomness breaks up the moire effect.

So Fuji built a new sensor employing what it knew from the film business. Instead of using the Bayer array, it created a pattern called the X-Trans sensor which lays out the red green and blue photo sensors in a way that simulates the randomness of analog film.

Furchgott does a good job of explaining the new sensor design (and its benefits) in an easy-to-understand way.

Old Technology Modernizes a Camera Sensor [NYTimes]

The New York Times on Why It Published New Impending Death Photo

The New York Post sparked a firestorm of controversy last week after publishing a photo of a man about to be struck by a subway train. People around the world were outraged that a photographer decided to photograph what had occurred, that he had sold (or, in the photographer’s words, licensed) the photo to a newspaper, and that the paper decided to publish it with a sensationalist front page story.

The New York Times found an eerily similar story on its hands this week, but its handling of the situation — and the subsequent public reaction to the article — has been drastically different.
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Photographing a Photographer: Shooting a Portrait of Joel Meyerowitz for the NYT

New York Times staff photographer Fred R. Conrad was recently tasked with shooting a portrait of acclaimed color photography pioneer Joel Meyerowitz. Freelance videographer Elaisha Stokes went along to shadow Conrad, and captured this interesting behind-the-scenes video in which Conrad shares some thoughts on the experience of pointing a lens at a master of pointing lenses.
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