Posts Tagged ‘negatives’

Old Aerial Photographs May Hold the Key to Solving the Amelia Earhart Mystery

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More than 75 years ago, aviator Amelia Earhart disappeared not far from the completion of her record-breaking attempt to circumnavigate the Earth at the equator. The wreckage of her plane was never found, and many believe that what’s left of that wreckage is still somewhere at the bottom of the Pacific ocean.

Another theory, however, is that Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan made an emergency landing on the reef surrounding the yet uninhabited island known as Gardner Island (now Nikumaroro). And some recently found aerial negatives of that island might hold to key to proving this theory right. Read more…

Photos Created by Coating Negatives with Gasoline and Setting Them On Fire

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Lisle, Illinois-based photographer Peter Hoffman‘s “Fox River Derivatives” project is a series of abstract photos that question mankind’s relationship with natural resources. The photographs have a strange purple bubbles and colorations across the surface that are the result of an interesting technique: these images are what you get when you burn your negatives.
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Beijing Silvermine: Rescuing Discarded Negatives from Illegal Recycling Centers

For his most recent project, French photography collector and editor Thomas Sauvin has been spending his time digging though illegal silver recycling centers in Beijing. He’s doing this because buried within piles of X-Rays and CD-ROMs are hidden millions of discarded film negatives that Sauvin is intent on preserving. Read more…

Collapsible Hanging Bookshelf Made with Reused 35mm Film Strips

VU35 is a new brand by Lucas Desimone and Matias Resich that offers products created from wood and reused 35mm film — a plastic material that’s difficult to dispose of. Their first product is a minimalistic collapsible bookshelf called Filmantes, which uses strips of film to connect three wooden shelves.
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Make Personalized Bookmarks Using 35mm Film Strips

If you have some unwanted 35mm negatives lying around and need a simple gift idea, you can try your hand at turning them into one-of-a-kind bookmarks. Simply cut out the actual frames from the film strip and replace them with actual photographs to create film strips that you don’t need to hold up to the light to enjoy.

Create a Stylish Bookmark with 35mm Film [Lomography]

Turn Your Unwanted Negatives into Film Candle Holders

If you ever find yourself with some unwanted negatives on your hands, you can upcycle them into creative film candle holders! All you need is a glass candle holder and some way to fix your negatives to it.

Make a Film Candle Holder in 3 Steps [Photojojo]

Legal Rumble Over Alleged Ansel Adams “Lost Negatives” Ends with Settlement

A huge story last year was when a painter named Rick Norsigian came across 65 glass negatives at a garage sale, purchasing them for $45. He then had them examined by experts, who told him that they were previously undiscovered Ansel Adams photographs worth at least $200 million. Just as the find was being heralded as one of the greatest in art history, Ansel Adams’ relatives and Publishing Rights Trust expressed skepticism that they were in fact Adams’. It then came to light that the photos might actually belong to a man named Earl Brooks who once lived in the same city as Norsigian (Fresno, California).
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Ansel Adams’ Relatives and Trust Still Skeptical of Garage Sale Negatives

We reported yesterday that a set of glass plate negatives purchased for $45 in 2000 were verified by a group of experts as being created by Ansel Adams and worth upwards of $200 million.

In response to the article published by CNN yesterday, Ansel’s grandson Matthew Adams published a lengthy response on the Ansel Adams Gallery Blog.
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Forgotten Beatles Photos Found After Nearly Half a Century

37 previously unseen photographs of the Beatles have been found after being forgotten for nearly half a century. Photographer Paul Berriff captured the photographs during a Beatles tour in 1963 and 1964 when he was just 16 years old, but the negatives ended up being forgotten for over 45 years along with 850 other negatives.

The photographs were created using two film cameras: a Rolleiflex and a 35mm Nikon, the latter of which he still uses to this day. Berriff went on to photograph many of the most recognizable artists and groups in the music industry (i.e. The Rolling Stones and Queen), and won a BAFTA award as a documentary filmmaker.

Berriff has set up a website called The Beatles Hidden Gallery where he is selling prints of the photographs. Only 49 prints of each photograph will be made.

(via Amateur Photographer)


Image credits: Photographs by Paul Berriff and used with permission