Posts Tagged ‘neat’

DIY: All-in-One Light Grid Diffuser and Cool Background Made from Plastic Bottles

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We wouldn’t exactly describe it as ‘elegant,’ but this little DIY project by Instructables user pizzidave is both functional and extremely easy to make. Requiring almost no DIY ‘skill’ of any kind, you can create a cool background and grid diffuser for yourself using some plastic bottles and rubber bands. Read more…

A Look Inside Casey Neistat’s Extremely Efficient Studio Workspace

Casey Neistat is a YouTube filmmaker who has had several of his creations — including this handy guide to not sucking on Instagram — go viral. He’s also the creator of the series The Neistat Brothers on HBO.

His success has made it possible for him to set up the perfect studio situation in his New York workspace, and in this short video series, we get a tour of the extremely organized space where the YouTube magic happens. Read more…

Mind-Bending Recursive Illusion Created Using Printed Photographs

Whoa. If you enjoy watching mind-bending concepts that confuse you and make your brain hurt, check out this experimental short by Willie Witte, titled “Screengrab.”

Nothing in the video is computer generated trickery: it simply uses clever camera tricks and a whole lotta printed photographs to create the seamless transitions. “All the trickery took place literally in front of the camera,” Witte says. See if you can understand what’s going on through the entire 1 minute and 30 seconds.
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Camera Synchronized to Chopper Blades Creates Amazing Illusion

Here’s an old-ish video that’s been making the rounds again lately (viral videos are like viruses — they don’t go away very easily). Titled “Camera shutter speed synchronized with helicopter blade frequency,” it shows what can happen when your camera is synchronized with the RPM of a helicopter’s rotor blades. The resulting footage makes the helicopter look as though it’s just floating in the air!
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Google Street View Photos, ASCII Style

Ascii Street View is a web app by programmer Peter Nitsch that converts Google Street View panorama photos into ASCII art in real time. Load up the app and type in your address to see your location displayed as colorful characters. There’s also a “green” option that produces images that are reminiscent of The Matrix.

Ascii Street View (via Laughing Squid)

Video Vignettes Inspired by David Hockney’s Photocollages

Filmmaker Ian Gamester created this video of moments collected over the course of several years, inspired by artist David Hockney’s photocollages, his famous “joiners.”
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Falling Water Frozen in Mid-Air with the Help of Frame Rate Trickery

When recording video, a camera’s frame rate can produce some pretty strange effects. If matched up with a helicopter’s blades, a helicopter looks like it’s hovering in midair with motionless blades. YouTube user mrbibio found that the same thing can be done with falling water. His technique is brilliant: by pressing a water tube against a speaker, mrbibio was able to control the vibration frequency of the water flowing through the tube. He then adjusted the pulses of the water to match up with the frame rate of his Canon 5D Mark II. The result is a video of the water looking as though it’s frozen in time.

(via Gizmodo via Photography Bay)

How to Create a Mind-Bending Camera-less Mirror Self-Portrait

Snapping a self-portrait of oneself in a mirror is something every photographer has probably done before, but have you ever created one in which there isn’t a camera in the shot? The images look impossible, but they’re not too difficult to create using some careful planning and clever Photoshop trickery. Basically, all you need to do is photograph each arm and your head separately and then stitch the photographs together. Joshua Dunlop over at ExpertPhotography has published a tutorial on the technique.

Hidden Camera Mirror Photo Trick [ExpertPhotography]

Worn DSLR Grip Replaced with an Old Leather Shoe and Rubber Cement

When the grip on his Canon Rebel T2i finally peeled and warped beyond repair, NYU computer science and mechanical engineering student Rob Huebner decided to go the DIY route. He found a beat up leather shoe, cut the proper shape out of it, and attached the leather graft onto his DSLR using rubber cement.


Image credit: Photograph by Rob Huebner and used with permission

Shoot, Share, and Explore Satellite Photos of Earth with Stratocam

If you’ve always wanted to be an astronaut photographer shooting images of Earth from a window of the International Space Station, Stratocam is an app for you. Created by Paul Rademacher, it allows you to snap your own photographs inside Google Maps’ satellite view of our planet. You can also view and rate other people’s photos, and browse the highest rated images from around the world.
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