Posts Tagged ‘NASA’

Time-Lapse Shows What Earth Looks Like to Astronauts on the ISS

We shared this time-lapse by photographer Bruce W. Berry yesterday in a post about NASA astronaut photography from the International Space Station, but we’d like to share about it a little more about it since it’s something that definitely deserves its own post.
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A White-Balanced Panoramic Photo of a Martian Mountain, Courtesy of Curiosity

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The latest panorama sent down by NASA’s Mars Curiosity Rover is unique in more ways than one. Not only is it a panorama taken on another planet (still blows our minds), it’s also been subjected to some post production. The photo — a piece of which is seen above — has actually had its white balance modified by NASA to make it look more like it was taken on Earth. Read more…

Paying Tribute to Astronaut Don Pettit and His Amazing Photography from the ISS

Like many of us, astrophotographer Christoph Malin is a big fan of astronaut and fellow photographer Don Pettit. We’ve featured Pettit’s photography several times before — we even shared his entire talk from Luminance 2012 here — but in the video above, Malin puts together a little bit of both into a fitting tribute to his favorite “astronaut, poet and astrophotographer.” Read more…

Erupting Volcano As Seen From The ISS

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Since we’ve been talking about taking pictures of outer space, it only seems right that we share an incredible picture taken from outer space. This photo, taken by astronauts aboard the International Space Station, shows the incredible vantage point they were privy to in 2009 when they witnessed an eruption of the highly active Sarychev Volcano. Read more…

A Birds-Eye View Photo of Space Shuttle Discovery’s First Launch

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NASA’s Space Shuttle Discovery’s first launch was back on August 30th, 1984 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. During the event, astronaut John W. Young was flying nearby in a Shuttle Training Aircraft, which astronauts use to assess weather conditions prior to launches and landings.

Shortly after Discovery lifted into the air, Young pulled out his camera and snapped the above picture-perfect photograph of the orbiter climbing into space. He managed to catch the shuttle and its fiery trail framed by the reflection of the sun on the Atlantic Ocean. You can find a much higher resolution version of this photograph here.


Image credit: Photograph by John Young/NASA

Amateur Astrophotographers and Hubble Tag Team to Create Galaxy Photo

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The space agencies that run the Hubble Space Telescope may have some of the most powerful photographic equipment at their disposal, but every now and then they can still use a little help from amateur astrophotographers.

Amateur astrophotographer Robert Gendler created the beautiful photograph above showing the spiral galaxy M106 by compositing existing imagery captured by the Hubble telescope with his own photos captured from Earth.
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Astronauts on the ISS Use a ‘NightPod’ to Stabilize Their Low-Light Photos

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Astronaut photographers on the International Space Station have been beaming quite a few photographs of Earth as of late, but have you ever wondered how they manage capture relatively sharp photographs of Earth’s cities at night?

The speed at which the ISS hurtles around our planet is indeed a major challenge for low-light photography, and astronauts in the past have tried to overcome it by using high-speed film or by doing some manual tracking (which is very hit-and-miss). Luckily, space shooters nowadays have a new special tool up their sleeve: the NightPod.
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Why We Did, In Fact, Land on the Moon: A Photography-Based Proof

One of the most vehemently argued conspiracy theories of all time is that, in 1969, NASA did not actually land on the moon. Many different breakdowns of the photo and video footage have been used to make this point (think: flag waving, missing stars, etc), leading most conspiracy theorists to argue that the great Stanley Kubrick actually filmed the moon landing in a television studio.

Writer/Director S.G. Collins, however, disagrees — and he’s got the photographic/videographic reasoning to prove it. Fair warning, Mr. Collins does drop the occasional curse word throughout the video and the humor may be a bit dry for some people’s tastes, but he does offer fairly conclusive evidence to back up his point: while the technology to land on the moon did exist in ’69, the technology to fake it did not.

(via Fstoppers)

Who is the Photographer Behind Photos Shot by the Curiosity Rover on Mars?

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We’ve written a number of posts regarding the NASA Curiosity rover’s photography on Mars, but have you ever wondered who it is that “presses the shutter”? If you have, you’re not alone. The Planetary Society recently received the question as well, and has published an official explanation from NASA:

It would be nice if the pictures took themselves. But it takes a village, it seems, to get a picture taken on Mars [...] for a single snap shot you might have the Geology Science Theme Group conceive and design it en masse; the PUL-1 plan it; the entire (on staff) Science Operations Working Group discuss it and include it in the daily plan, the PUL-2 actually write it, and the engineering uplink team review and approve it before the Ace hits the button to radiate it, with the sol’s command, bundle to the rover. That’s a group the size of a small village.

Camera operator Mark Lemmon also talks about how the team often goes to great lengths to nail lighting and composition. With so many resources drained into each photo, casual snapshots aren’t exactly Curiosity’s thing.

Who is the photographer behind Mars rover photos? Answer from Mark Lemmon [The Planetary Society]

The Last Man to Walk On the Moon Left His Camera for a Long-Term Gear Test

You may have heard that there are 12 Hasselblad film cameras sitting on the surface of the moon at this very moment, left there by astronauts who needed to lighten their vessel’s load as much as possible. However, did you know that at least one of those cameras was left there to test the durability of the gear?
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