Posts Tagged ‘musicvideo’

“Camera Hang Low” Music Video

To celebrate the end of the school year, the photojournalism students at Western Kentucky University created this music video for a song titled “Camera Hang Low” by Benny Sevs feat. the F-Stopz. It asks the important question that every serious photographer needs to answer: “Do ya camera hang low?”.


Thanks for sending in the tip, Jabin!

Stop-Motion Music Video Showing Board Games Being Sliced and Diced

If you like PES’ stop-motion videos in which random objects are prepared as food, you’ll love this creative music video for the song “Get By” by Delta Heavy. It’s mind-boggling to think about how much time and energy went into preparing and photographing each individual still: director Ian Robertson shot 11,008 photographs and selected 3,184 for the final cut. 10 hours were required just to animate the 18 frames showing the Rubik’s Cube equalizer. Animation took a total of 32 days. You can find more background information and photos here.

85 Dancers From 22 Countries Stitched Into One Composite Music Video

Director Ninian Doff made this creative music video for singer Graham Coxon‘s song “What’ll It Take” by stitching together dance moves sent in by 85 of Coxon’s fans from 22 countries around the world, turning them into one composite dancer.

(via It’s Neat That via Photojojo)

Time-Lapse Stop-Motion Music Video by Indie Band Wildlife Control

San Francisco-based indie band Wildlife Control made this creative music video for their song “Analog or Digital” using both time-lapes and stop-motion techniques. They spent a day on at Ocean Beach in SF, shooting the entire video in one take as a series of 3,060 individual photographs. The fast playback makes the world around them pass in time-lapse, while their synchronized movements cause them to move around like stop-motion claymation figures. It’s definitely not an easy feat — they had to play the song slowed down 35x!

(via Wildlife Control via Photojojo)

Amazing Stop-Motion Music Video Made Using 920 Colored Pencils

Here’s another cool example of what’s possible when you combine creativity with an insane amount of dedication: animator Jonathan Chong spent hundreds of hours creating this stop motion video for the song “Against The Grain” by the Australian band Hudson. He animated everything by hand, and captured 5125 individual photographs of 920 pencils for the three-minute long finished product.
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Stop-Motion Music Video Shot Over Two Years with 288,000 Jelly Beans

Want to see what pure dedication looks like? This music video for the song “In Your Arms” by Kina Grannis is a stop-motion animation done with a background composed of jelly beans. It’s a crazy project that required 22 months, 1,357 hours, 30 people, and 288,000 jelly beans. They could have used CGI, of course, but each frame was carefully created by hand and photographed with a still camera. It’s even more mind-blowing given this fact: none of it was done with a green screen.
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Music Video Created with 3,233 Printed Photos Over Half a Year

Australian college student Nathan Grant created this stop-motion music video for the song ‘Minister’s Daughter’ by the band The Good God Damned. After recording footage of the band playing using a Sony XDCAM, Grant printed out 3,433 photographs from stills in the video. He then spent six months turning the prints into this stop-motion video, capturing the new photographs with a Canon 600D.

Indie Band Creates Music Video Using Crowdsourced Instagram Photos

Instagram is changing not just the way photos can be shared, but how music videos can be made. UK indie rock band The Vaccines recently created a website that asked fans to snap photographs of themselves while at music festivals and then tag them with “#VACCINESVIDEO”. After receiving nearly 3,000 submissions, the band used them to create the music video for their song “Wetsuit”. Aside from a few video clips, everything you see in the video was submitted through Instagram.

(via Mashable)


P.S. Building upon this idea: what if a band were to ask fans to snap photos during a live performance of a song, and then combine the photos afterward using the timestamps of the photos to sync them with the song? That would be crazy.

Creative Stop-Motion Music Video Using a Boatload of Prints

Photographer Nathan Seabrook made this creative stop-motion music video for the band Yuba Diamond. Despite what your eyes might tell you to believe, no computer trickery was used. Instead, Seabrook used roughly 1700 separate prints and some old fashioned techniques (e.g. fishing line and projecting scenes onto the background) for all the animations and effects seen in the video.

Music Made Entirely from Camera Sounds

Lv Sisi created this music video, titled “Digital Analogue”, using only sounds recorded from a collection of antique cameras and 6,000 individual photographs carefully shot and edited together into an artistic stop-motion video.

(via NYIP)