Posts Tagged ‘movie’

The “World’s Smallest Movie”, Created in Stop-Motion Using Individual Atoms

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Back in 2010, Nokia created “the world’s smallest stop-motion video” using its new N8 smartphone and a tiny 9mm-tall figure of a girl. If you think 9mm is tiny, try 1/25,000,000th of a inch!

Today, IBM scientists announced that they have created the world’s smallest movie. Unlike the previous record holder, this one will be extremely difficult to beat. The stop-motion movie was made using individual atoms.
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Trailer Shows Pokemon Snap Turned Into a Live-Action Movie

Here’s a bit of silly humor as we’re winding down the workweek: if you’re a photography enthusiast who has fond memories of playing Pokemon Snap during the days of the Nintendo 64, then you might enjoy this humorous fake trailer by Gritty Reboots, which takes popular movies, TV shows, video games and turns them into cinematic trailers.

This one imagines what a live-action Pokemon Snap movie would be like.
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Directed, Edited, Written, Acted, Scored, and Produced by Shane Carruth

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Think it’s difficult to juggle multiple aspects of your photography business? If you want to see an example of a highly motivated creative individual, check out what American filmmaker Shane Carruth has been up to in the film industry.

In 2004, Carruth released the indie sci-fi movie Primer. It had a ridiculously low budget of $7,000, and went on to gross over half a million dollars and gather a large cult following.
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Trailer for the Upcoming Documentary on Street Photographer Vivian Maier

This 2 minute 39 second video is the official trailer for the upcoming documentary, “Finding Vivian Maier.” It tells the story of one of the greatest photography finds in recent history, and of the brilliant work of a photographer no one had heard of just a decade ago.
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McCullin: A Documentary Film About the Iconic War Photographer

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Don McCullin is known the world over for his incredible work as a photojournalist. His powerful and moving photography of devastation and suffering in Cyprus, The Congo, Vietnam and many others have won him worldwide acclaim as one of the greatest ever.

And now, for those who don’t know about his life’s work, or really anybody who wants to see what being one of the most prolific (and perhaps most haunted) photojournalists of our time means, the documentary ‘McCullin’ is here to fill you in. Read more…

Feature Film Shot Inside Disney Theme Parks Without Permission

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There are some places where you’re just not allowed to stage a professional photo or video shoot, and topping that list would be places like Disney World, Disneyland, and probably Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino. The thing is, some photographers and videographers have no problem ignoring the rules to get a great shot (think: rooftopping).

Writer and filmmaker Randy Moore, however, took it to another level with his upcoming movie “Escape from Tomorrow.” He somehow managed to film almost the entire thing inside both Disney World and Disneyland without getting permission… or getting caught. Read more…

Motion Image Photography: Pulling Stills from Super-High-Res Video

Motion image photography is a new name for an old concept: pulling stills from video. In fact, famed headshot photographer Peter Hurley took a stab at it last year, pinning the 5K Red Epic against his Hasselblad to see if he could recreate his work in video. The issue there, even ignoring price, was that the sheer size of the Red Epic makes it far too bulky for anything but studio work.

Well, in this short documentary/experiment, photographer Abraham Joffe and a few of his esteemed photographic friends set out to see if technology had finally shrunken down and advanced to the point where the terms photographer and videographer could essentially become one and the same. Their tool of choice was Canon’s new 1D C, and their results were phenomenal. (Warning: the video contains a tiny bit of nudity).
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Chasing Ice: Photog Captures Changes in Glaciers Through Time-Lapse Photos

Here’s the amazing official trailer for the upcoming documentary film Chasing Ice, which follows one man as he embarks on an epic photo project around the world:

In the spring of 2005, National Geographic photographer James Balog headed to the Arctic on a tricky assignment: to capture images to help tell the story of the Earth’s changing climate.

[…] Chasing Ice is the story of one man’s mission to change the tide of history by gathering undeniable evidence of our changing planet. Within months of that first trip to Iceland, the photographer conceived the boldest expedition of his life: The Extreme Ice Survey. With a band of young adventurers in tow, Balog began deploying revolutionary time-lapse cameras across the brutal Arctic to capture a multi-year record of the world’s changing glaciers.

[…] It takes years for Balog to see the fruits of his labor. His hauntingly beautiful videos compress years into seconds and capture ancient mountains of ice in motion as they disappear at a breathtaking rate. Chasing Ice depicts a photographer trying to deliver evidence and hope to our carbon-powered planet.

As we shared back in March, Balog created his epic time-lapse videos by placing 27 Nikon D200 DSLRs around the world, setting each of them to snap 8,000 photos a year.
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Sign of the Times: Fujifilm to Stop Making Film for the Cinema Industry

Less than a month after Kodak announced the sale of its photographic film business, Fujifilm has some downer news of its own: the end of its motion picture film business.
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What if Movies Were Written and Voiced-Over by Little Kids?

Lets say you find an imaginative kid, put a pen in one of his hands, put a camera in the other, and ask him to create a movie. What would you get?

That’s the basic idea behind Kid Snippets, a cute and hilarious new web series by BoredShortsTV. For the short above, titled “Salesman”, filmmaker Ryan Haldeman had a couple kids come up with an interaction between a salesman and a customer. He then took the resulting audio, and had actors John and Brett Roberts act it out and mouth the words. What resulted was the humorous sketch seen above.
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