Posts Tagged ‘motion’

DIY Tutorial: A Cheap Way to Motorize Your Slider and Add Motion to Your Time-Lapses

If you’re looking for a comparatively cheap DIY option for adding a variable speed motor to a standard slider (most often used to shoot those cool motion time-lapses), this tutorial is perfect for you. Read more…

Creating Motion in Stills: How to Animate a Photo in Post with the Parallax Effect

UK motion graphics artist and Make Productions founder Joe Fellows specializes in bringing stills to life. Using a series of steps in Photoshop and then After Effects, Fellows is able to transform photos into ‘2.5D’ animated sequences that look like slow motion footage shot with a video camera. Read more…

Pixy: A Low Cost Camera that Recognizes and Follows Objects by Color

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Camera technology is always being used/tweaked in one way or another to yield surprising or novel results. In some cases, that means creating a camera that sees like a bug’s eye. In others, one that perceives only motion, like a retina.

The most recent camera innovation we’ve stumble across falls a bit closer to the second of those. It’s called Pixy, and it’s a color-detecting camera that might some day soon be the eye with which your friendly neighborhood robot sees and interprets the world. Read more…

Retina-Inspired ‘Dynamic Vision’ Camera Works Like the Human Eye

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Technology often borrows ideas from nature, and camera technology is no exception. For example, you might remember the bug-inspired compound eye camera we shared just a few months back. Engineers at Swiss company iniLabs don’t want to mimic bug eyes, however, they’d rather create something that mimics the human eye. And that’s exactly what they did with the new Dynamic Vision Sensor (DVS) 128 camera. Read more…

This Robotic Camera System Can Capture Bullet Time Slow Motion Replays

The folks over at NHK’s (the Japan Broadcasting Corporation’s) Science & Technology Research Laboratory have developed a groundbreaking multi-viewpoint, motion-controlled camera rig that could very soon be changing the way we view sports, among many other potential applications.

The rig is a robotically controlled system that links one camera to eight sub-cameras, all of which are pointing at the same thing. Basically, it’s a bullet time rig that moves, enabling the people behind the lenses to take the technique of timeslicing to new heights. Read more…

Beautiful Light Painting Photos Created With Dancers and Athletes

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Combining light painting with sports that involve long fluid motion is a match made in photography heaven that companies like Red Bull have already taken advantage of to create some pretty spectacular shots.

Photographers Joanna Jaskólska and Zach Ancell both had similar ideas, and their resulting photo series — Breakdance Baby! and Trajectory — are both unique examples of the awesome photography you can create when you mix dance, athletics and light painting. Read more…

The Beauty of Parkour Photographed with a Flash and Some Flour

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Dancers are often photographed with off-camera flashes and powder in order to capture their movement. Photographer Ben Franke recently completed a project titled Parkour Motion in which he used the same concept, except for parkour practitioners (called “traceurs”) rather than dancers.
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BTS: Capturing Two Band Portraits That Feature Motion and Blur

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Here’s a behind-the-scenes look at how I recently created two band photos that feature motion and blur. The premise for this shoot actually started as far back as a couple years ago. I was on the search for a fun and energetic band with which to create a couple of promo images that featured motion. It took 2.5 years to find the right band for the shoots, but when 604 Records recording artists Fighting for Ithaca came calling, the perfect fit had been found!
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Blurred Long-Exposure Portraits Showing Dancers in Motion

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For his project titled Motion, Brooklyn, New York-based photographer Bill Wadman shot portraits of dancers with a slow shutter speed in order to capture their movements through motion blur. The resulting photographs look like a strange fusion of photography and painting.
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Abstract Photographs of Human Bodies in Motion

Japanese photographer Shinichi Maruyama has an interesting series of photos simply titled, “Nude.” Each image shows an abstract flesh-colored shape that’s created by a nude subject dancing in front of the camera.
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