Posts Tagged ‘mirrorless’

Olympus Hints at a Mirrorless Successor to the E-5, DSLR Line to End?

olympusem5micro

In a recent interview with Quesabesde, Miguel Angel Garcia, the CEO of Olympus Spain, dropped another “official” hint at what the camera company is cooking up to replace the E-5. The subsequent article, which initially said that the camera would be compatible with both Micro Four Thirds and Four Thirds Lenses, has since been reworded to state simply that the replacement for the E-5 will be “capable of harnessing the full potential of Four Thirds lenses.”
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Nikon to Announce Two New Mirrorless Cameras at CES 2013: The J3 and S1

nikonmirrorless

The mirrorless camera market has been bustling with activity as of late. Rumors have already begun circulating that Canon will be releasing a viewfinder-equipped EOS-M sometime in 2013, Polaroid is working on a Nikon J2 lookalike, and CES is just around the corner, which means many camera makers will be taking the wraps off upgrades to their mirrorless lines.

The latest word from the world of Nikon is still a bit surprising, though: Nikon Rumors is reporting that the camera giant is going to add not one, but two new mirrorless cameras to its Nikon 1 line at CES 2013.
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Viewfinder-Equipped Canon EOS M Will Reportedly Arrive Late Next Year

One of the big complaints people have about the Canon EOS M (besides the horrendously slow autofocus) is the lack of a viewfinder. While autofocus can be improved through firmware updates, you can’t simply add an EVF or OVF to a camera by rolling out a download. Luckily, there appears to be a second EOS M camera on the way that does offer an electronic viewfinder.
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Review: Fujifilm X-E1 is Both a Beauty and a Beast

During the earlier days of 35mm film photography, many of the popular cameras had distinct design elements that defined the look of that period — the things that come to mind when people hear the words “vintage 35mm camera”: a shiny body seemingly crafted out of a single chunk of metal; a textured covering that gives the camera style and grip; all the manual controls you need, placed in well-thought-out locations at your fingertips.

When cameras started becoming smarter and more automated, many of the convenient physical controls began to disappear. By the time cameras started becoming digital, the consumer market had become flooded with designs that looked nothing like cameras of old and more like the computers that were taking over the world.
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“We May Be Seeing the Beginning of the Collapse of the Compact Camera Market”

Hiroshi Hiyama over at Phys.Org reports that smartphones are crushing the point-and-shoot industry, putting compact cameras in the same group as video game consoles and portable music players — devices that are having a hard time competing against all-in-one phones. The numbers are crazy:

Just as digital cameras all but destroyed the market for photographic film, the rapid shift to picture-taking smartphones has torn into a camera sector dominated by Japanese firms including Canon, Olympus, Sony and Nikon. “We may be seeing the beginning of the collapse of the compact camera market,” said [analyst] Nobuo Kurahashi. Figures from Japan’s Camera and Imaging Products Association echo the analyst’s grim prediction. Global shipments of digital cameras among Japanese firms tumbled about 42 percent in September from a year ago to 7.58 million units, with compact offerings falling 48 percent, according to the Association. Higher-end cameras with detachable lenses fell a more modest 7.4 percent in that time, it said.

As the compact camera market shrinks, the war over mirrorless camera dominance is growing. All the major camera makers now have a horse in that race, which will only be heating up as consumers discover that they no longer have a need for small-sensor cameras.

Smartphones crushing point-and-shoot camera market [Phys.Org]


Image credit: Photo illustration based on still from Inception by Warner Bros. Pictures

Survey: Majority of Non-Pro DSLR Users Use Their Cameras as Point-and-Shoots

Sony is continuing its campaign against the mindless use of DSLRs. After releasing a series of viral videos poking fun at inept DSLR users, Sony is now turning to facts and hard evidence (in addition to humor). The company recently did a survey of 1012 non-professional DSLR users, and the results are pretty interesting.
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Review: Canon EOS M is Like a Sluggish DSLR Trapped in a Compact Body

Canon made its loyal customers wait quite a long time before it finally joined the mirrorless camera revolution, announcing the Canon EOS M back in June. The camera comes nearly four years after Panasonic kicked things off by “friending” Olympus — forming the Micro Four Thirds alliance — and introducing the Lumix DMC-G1, making Canon the last major DSLR maker to join the fray.
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Canon Set to Unveil a New EOS M Camera and Two New DSLRs in Early 2013

As we’re exiting one camera announcement season, rumors are starting to heat up about the next. Canon reportedly has some major announcements just around the corner to announce three new cameras: a second mirrorless camera and two DSLRs.
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Samsung Giving Away Galaxy Tablets with Its NX Mirrorless Cameras

Leave it up to Samsung to hold crazy promotions for its mirrorless cameras — at least in the UK. The company recently offered to give a NX1000 mirrorless camera to anyone named David Bailey; 142 David Baileys came forward to claim their camera. Now the camera maker is doing another unique promo, and this time it’s open to the general public: it’s giving away tablet computers with its mirrorless cameras.
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A Graphical Comparison of Mirrorless Camera Sensors Sizes

Mirrorless cameras feature sensors larger than compact cameras and bodies smaller than DSLRs, but how do their sensor sizes compare with one another? To give you a better idea of how formats such as Nikon CX and Olympus/Panasonic Four Thirds stack up against each other, Digital Camera Database created this helpful graphic showing the relative sizes of each format.
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