Posts Tagged ‘michaelwolf’

Eye-Popping Photographs of Hong Kong High-Rise Apartment Buildings

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With a population of over 7 million people packed into an area of 426 square miles, Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated places in the world. As with other places where development cannot expand horizontally, apartment buildings tend to get taller and taller in order to provide living space for all the inhabitants.

German photographer Michael Wolf decided to capture this population density through a series of photographs studying the architecture of these high rises. The project is titled “Architecture of Density.”
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The Legality and Ethics of Pointing a Lens Into a Private Residence for Art

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Award-winning photographer Michael Wolf is raising some eyebrows with a new photo project titled “Window Watching.” The series features photographs of high-rise apartment windows in Hong Kong, offering glimpses into the lives of people living inside the private residences. Basically, Wolf pointed a telephoto lens at open windows to photograph people going about their day-to-day-lives, without their knowledge and consent.
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Sitting in China: A Series of Photographs Showing “Bastard Chairs”

Photographer Michael Wolf began his career as a photojournalist in Hong Kong working for a German magazine. In the early 2000s, he turned to non-editorial photography with an unusual project called Bastard Chairs. Wolf had noticed that all over China, there were makeshift chairs that had been put together using whatever materials the owners could get their hands on. He began documenting these strange pieces of furniture, showing the creative ideas people in China had for sitting down.
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Street View Screenshots: Photography or Plagiarism?

In 2011, photographer Michael Wolf was awarded Honorable Mention in the World Press Photo 2011 contest for screenshots taken from Google Street View. It immediately sparked a debate regarding whether or not the work should even be considered “original photography”. The Independent has an interesting article about a different Street View “photographer”: Jon Rafman, whose work we’ve featured here before.

At first, [Rafman] would spend eight to 12 hours at a time traversing the globe from his desktop. “It was destroying my body,” he says. But when the images he’d collected went viral online, he began to take submissions from other users, too. Some had collected images of prostitutes at work, others presented car accidents, even dead bodies left by the side of the road – and, presumably, ignored by Google’s drivers. Many of the images in the exhibition have now been wiped from the web: the perps lined up against a wall by the São Paolo police are gone from Google Maps. A man sitting with his legs splayed strangely around a lamppost in Toronto has been blurred into obscurity.

Rafman’s images, by contrast, are almost entirely untreated. He even leaves the Google Street View navigation tool in the top-left corner of each photograph. “The work is connected to the history of street photography,” he explains, “but also to the 20th-century ready-made movement. So leaving those artefacts in the image is extremely important. In the bottom-left corner of each picture is a link that says, ‘Report a problem’.

His work, titled The Nine Eyes of Google Street View, will soon be exhibited at London’s Saatchi Gallery.

Google Street View photographs: the man on the street [The Independent]

Michael Wolf On His Fascination With “Peeping”

When photographer Michael Wolf had to move to Paris in 2008 because of a job opportunity for his wife, he wasn’t too thrilled with the situation. He thought that living in one of the most photographed cities of all time, surrounded by the inevitable cliches of such a place, wasn’t conducive to creative, unique photography. So he sat down at his computer and began browsing through the then only 6-month old Google Street View, which ultimately led to a unique photographical project that fit right in with his long-time fascination with “peeping” into people’s lives through photography. Read more…

Michael Wolf Discusses Using Google Street View for His “Photography”

Last month there was quite a bit of buzz among photographers when photographer Michael Wolf‘s Google Street View “photographers” (or screenshots) were awarded Honorable Mention at the prestigious World Press Photo 2011 contest. A month later, the British Journal of Photography tracked him down and interviewed him regarding the work.

While you might not agree with the World Press Photo’s decision to award him Honorable Mention, Wolf does have some pretty interesting thoughts on Google Street View and its place in photography. He points out that Google Street View will be a treasure trove of imagery in the future, when people will look back on our time and place in the same way we look back on Atget‘s documentation of Parisian streets.

Michael Wolf welcomes World Press Photo controversy (via Photoxels)

Photog Receives World Press Photo Honorable Mention for Street View Shots

Does Google Street View count as photojournalism? That’s the question that’s being discussed on the Interwebs after photographer Michael Wolf was given honorable mention in this year’s World Press Photo contest for a series of photographs made using Google’s Street View. “A Series of Unfortunate Events” contains photographs created by Wolf of unique scenes found in Google’s street imagery, which is captured by Google using special camera-equipped vans driven down streets.
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