Posts Tagged ‘met’

A Look at Some of the Most Powerful and Iconic Photography from the Civil War

The Civil War wasn’t the first war to be photographed, but the leaps and bounds that photographic technology had taken leading up to the war in 1861 enabled American photographers at the time to come out en masse when news of the attack on Fort Sumter came.

Many photos came out of the war, showing everything from the horrifically scarred back of an escaped slave, to the bravado of young confederate soldiers. In the video above, curator of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “Photography and the American Civil War” exhibit Jeff L. Rosenheim walks us through some of those photos, explaining the role each one played in documenting four years of bloodshed. Read more…

William Eggleston and the Validation of Color Photography as Legitimate Art

eggleston

William Eggleston didn’t invent color photography, but his landmark 1976 exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art gave it dignity, and began the four-decade process of acceptance by curators and collectors as an art form to rival oil painting.

Shot in 1970, “Untitled (Memphis)” – shown above – was one of the 75 photos in the show, and also featured on the cover of the catalogue. Now it’s included in a retrospective of Eggleston’s early work at the Metropolitan.
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Photoshopped Photos From Before the Days of Photoshop

Although Adobe Photoshop’s introduction in 1990 spawned the term “Photoshopping”, the manipulation of photos has been around pretty much as long as photography itself. To show this fact, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City will be holding an exhibition titled, “Faking It: Manipulated Photography Before Photoshop.” The show will feature 200 ‘shopped photographs created between the 1840s and the 1990s, providing a glimpse into how photographers of old use their work to humor and deceive.
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Photographer Wins £30,000 and an Apology After G20 Beatdown

64-year-old photographer David Hoffman has been awarded £30,000 and given an apology by the Metropolitan police after having five of his teeth knocked out when a policeman in riot gear charged Hoffman and hit him with a riot shield. The MPS released a statement staying,

On 1 April 2009 well-respected social issues photographer David Hoffman was recording the G20 protests in the City of London.

The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) recognise that Mr Hoffman was entitled to report on that day but was caused injury by an MPS officer during the event, preventing him from doing so.

The MPS confirms its recognition that freedom of the press is a cornerstone of democracy and that journalists have a right to report freely. The MPS apologise to Mr Hoffman for the treatment he received and have paid compensation.

It was at the same protests that newspaper vendor Ian Tomlinson was pushed to the ground and later died of a heart attack.

(via DigitalRev)


Image credit: The Met by zoonabar