Posts Tagged ‘marcdonahue’

Using a Hand-Held Bullet-Time GoPro Rig to Shoot a Music Video

You might remember PermaGrin Films’ Marc Donahue from his amazing “Dream Music: Part 2″ lyric-lapse video that took 6 hours of work for every 3 seconds of footage. We even shared a behind the scenes look at how that time-lapse was put together, complete with deleted scenes and director commentary.

Dream Music: Part 2 ultimately got some 2 million views on YouTube, but that doesn’t mean that Donahue has slowed down. His most recent project again involved putting together a unique music video, only this time it didn’t take six months to shoot. Instead of tackling time-lapse, “On Smash Live” was filmed using a hand-held bullet-time GoPro array. Read more…

BTS: Photographing a Lyric-Lapse Music Video Over the Course of Six Months

Back in August we shared a mesmerizing stop-motion video titled “Dream Music: Part 2″ and created by Marc Donahue and Sean Michael Williams. The team spent 6-8 hours of work photographing every 3-4 seconds of the 8-minute music video. All in all, the project took six months to complete. The video above presents a behind-the-scenes look at how the whole thing was done, with director’s commentary, deleted scenes, and a bunch of time-lapses of the time-lapse being shot.
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Lyric-Lapse Music Video That Required 6 Hours of Work for Every 3 Seconds

Dream Music: Part 2 is an amazing stop-motion and time-lapse video by Marc Donahue and Sean Michael Williams that features a technique they call “lyric-lapsing”. Using still photos, they somehow planned the time-lapse sequences just right, so that the singer in the video is actually mouthing the words as he scurries around to various locations. They state that the video is a “musical voyage into the depths of the subconscious”, and that it was designed to “transport the viewer from their own reality into a world of dreams and at the end, [...] awake to wonder how we were able to take them there.”

The magnitude of the effort is what’s truly impressive. The creators spent six months shooting the photos across two states. Every 3-4 seconds seen in the video required about 6-8 hours of work to create.
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