Posts Tagged ‘lytro’

Clever Hack for Shooting Lytro-Style DoF-Changeable Photos Using a DSLR

Lytro‘s groundbreaking consumer light-field camera made a splash in the camera industry this year by making it possible to refocus photographs after they’re shot. However, the cheapest model for the boxy device has a price tag of $399, and the reviews have been mixed so far.

If you’d like to play around with your own refocus-able photographs without having to buy an actual Lytro device, you can actually fake it using a standard DSLR camera (or any camera with manual focusing and a large-aperture lens).
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Lytro Gives a Sneak Peek of Perspective Shift and Living Filters

We’ve known since last month that Lytro is planning to roll out at least one fancy new feature for its light field cameras (parallax-based 3D), but now the company has taken the wraps off the feature to give us a sneak peek at what they’ll offer. The two new features that will soon appear in Lytro’s Desktop software are called Perspective Shift and Living Filters.
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Lytro Going 3D: A Peek at the Upcoming Parallax-Based Effect

Lytro has been upgrading its cameras and shipping them to store shelves all over the world as of late, and it’s not planning to let up anytime soon. In addition to the newly added manual controls, the company is gearing up to jump into the world of 3D.
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Lytro Launches Worldwide, Adds New Colors and Manual Controls

Lytro’s light field camera began hitting store shelves around the world today, and to celebrate, the company announced a couple of upgrades to the camera: manual new colors and manual controls.
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Lytro Going Global, to be Available at a Number of Retailers Starting in Oct.

It has been nearly a year since Lytro announced the world’s first consumer light-field camera that lets users focus photographs after they’re shot. Throughout this time, the camera has only been available direct from the company when ordered through the website. That’ll soon change, as the company announced today that it will be partnering with major retailers around the world to have the camera appear on a store shelf (and website) near you.
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Lytro Rolls Out the Windows Version of Its Software

If you’re a Windows user that preordered a Lytro light field camera, here’s some terrific news: your expensive paperweight is now a camera. Lytro announced the Windows version of its desktop application today, more than half a year after the “shoot-now-focus-later” camera was first unveiled. To free your photos from their camera prison, you’ll need to be running Windows 7 with at least 2GB of ram.

(via Lytro Blog)


Image credit: Lytro 16GB & 8GB versions by laihiu

More Ways to View Lytro Photos with Google Chrome Extensions

Lytro has been pushing to make their living pictures — interactive, clickable photos that have a variable focus point — easier to share. Lytro is a camera that has a very specific, proprietary way of saving and viewing photographs, so sharing these photos can be tricky. Nevertheless, Lytro has been able to quickly expand living photos across the web through social media, most recently to Google+ and Pinterest through Google Chrome extensions.
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Lytro Looking for a New CEO as Ren Ng Steps Into Executive Chairman Position

If you’re at all familiar with Lytro cameras and their light field technology, you’ll have heard of founder and CEO Ren Ng. However, he won’t be holding the title of CEO much longer. Two days ago Ng announced via blog post that he would be stepping aside as the CEO of Lytro and moving into the Executive Chairman position previously occupied by Charles Chi (who, incidentally, is now the interim CEO). Read more…

Lytro Founder Ren Ng on the Future of Photography

Here’s a talk that Lytro founder Ren Ng gave at TEDxSanJoseCA last month. He talks about the history of photography, his personal interest in it, and how his company’s light field camera will change how future generations think about the art.

(via Vincent Laforet)

A Look Inside Lytro’s Light Field Camera

Lytro‘s groundbreaking light field camera is finally landing in the hands of customers, and to give people a better idea of how the camera works, the New York Times has published an interesting diagram that shows what makes the camera tick. Here’s what DPreview has to say about the camera:

The Lytro LFC is so unlike any conventional camera that it doesn’t make sense to score it in comparison to them. Ultimately, though, we’re not convinced that the Lytro either solves any existing problem or presents any compelling raison d’etre of its own. If it were higher resolution or allowed greater separation or could produce single lens 3D video it might generate a lot more excitement. As it is, it feels like a product arriving before the underlying technology is really ready.

All of which is a great shame, because Lytro has done a great job of making a credible consumer product out of a piece of fairly abstract scientific research. It’s quite possible that in the hands of the right people it will result in some interesting creations but we just don’t yet see it as a mass-market device.

The New York Times came to the same conclusion — that the technology is revolutionary, but the product isn’t game-changing… yet.

A Review of the Lytro Camera (via Photojojo)