Posts Tagged ‘londonolympics’

David Burnett’s Speed Graphic Photos of the London 2012 Olympics

davidburnett_londonolympics-4

Last August, we wrote about how renowned photojournalist David Burnett was spotted using a large format camera at the London Olympics. If you’ve been wondering how the photographs turned out, today’s your lucky day.

Here’s an inside look at how Burnett’s project came to be, and the beautiful images that resulted.
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Nikon D4 Used by Usain Bolt at London Olympics Goes Up for Auction

Usain Bolt ran beyond the boundaries of sports and made headlines in the world of photography earlier this year at the London Olympics. After winning yet another gold in his 200m race, he ran over to Scandinavian newspaper photographer Jimmy Wixtröm, grabbed his Nikon D4, and began shooting some awesome photographs of what he was experiencing.

Wixtröm just sent us an email with some neat news: the famous D4 is now being auctioned with the proceeds going to charity.
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Photojournalist Uses iPhone to Cover Olympics

We’ve seen some very heavy-duty gear lugged out to cover the Olympic games in London this year: some robotic rigs, an 800mm lens that could easily weigh more than the average lady gymnast, and of course, the usual suspects in a packed camera bag. But Guardian photojournalist Dan Chung is traveling light: he’s covering the games with a simple iPhone setup.

Using different combinations of an iPhone 4s, a clip-on Schneider lens and a pair of Canon binoculars, Chung has been live-blogging all aspects of the games. His photos yield surprisingly crisp results, indoors, outdoors and even underwater through a viewing window — which again reinforces the old photographer’s adage that the best camera is the one that’s with you.

Chung uses the Snapseed app to do in-camera/phone edits. You can check out more of Chung’s work on his Guardian blog.

(via The Verge via dpreview)

Reuters’ Underwater Camera for Shooting Olympic Swimmers

Here’s a brief video in which Reuters shows off the special underwater camera it created to shoot swimming competitions at the London Olympics. The design was derived from the cameras used during the BP oil spill back in 2010.

Getty To Capture Olympics With Helicams Timelapse, 360-Degree Cameras and More

You may or may not know this, but Getty Images is actually the official photo agency of the 2012 London Olympics, and they plan on making this one of the most innovatively captured events in the history of photography. To do this they’ve enlisted as many new technologies as they can get their hands on: be it 3D, time lapse, 360-degree, or even helicam aerial photography/video, Getty intends on giving the people at home as immersive an experience of the Summer Olympic Games as possible.

Check out the video above for more info on both the how and the why behind Getty’s plans, plus a cool peek at the kinds of helicam shots we can expect to see in about a month and a half’s time.

(via Popular Photography)

Olympic Committee Clarifies Photography Rules for London 2012

A month ago, quite a bit of controversy was stirred up when Amateur Photographer pointed out some stringent and seemingly unenforceable restrictions included in the London 2012 Ticker Holder Agreement. Initially it seemed that attendees might have been prevented from posting images to social networks (an assumption which was later refuted). But even though attendees will be allowed to post images to Facebook to their heart’s content, amateurs and non-media who wanted to get some commercial-grade pictures of the Olympic events are still out of luck. Read more…

London Artist Creates World’s Longest Photo Out of 109,000 Individual Images

In celebration of the upcoming London 2012 Olympic Games — or maybe just because she felt like it — London artist Clare Newton has stitched together 109,000 photos into the (not yet official) world’s longest photo. The entire Jump4London project, which consists of one very long composite photo of people jumping, has taken 21 months of Newton’s life and will span over one kilometer when it’s all said, done and printed. And although it’s not official yet, the photo will be inspected and approved by the Guinness Book of World Records while it’s on display at ExCel London from June 1 through June 9.

(via RPS via Popular Photography)

London Olympics’ Photo Policy Not as Draconian as It Sounds

Amateur Photographer sparked an outcry among photographers this past Tuesday after it pointed out a section in the London Olympics’ ticketholder policies that states:

Images, video and sound recordings of the Games taken by a Ticket Holder cannot be used for any purpose other than for private and domestic purposes and a Ticket Holder may not license, broadcast or publish video and/or sound recordings, including on social networking websites and the internet more generally, and may not exploit images, video and/or sound recordings for commercial purposes under any circumstances, whether on the internet or otherwise, or make them available to third parties for commercial purposes.

Shortly after we reported on the story yesterday, a spokesman for the Olympics organizing committee (Locog) issued a response stating that they “are not looking to stop private individuals from posting photographs on social networks,” and that the intent is to prevent photos being used for commercial purposes. He did, however, acknowledge that the wording is unclear, saying that it will likely be clarified when tickets are mailed.

(via Amateur Photographer via TheDigitalVisual)


Image credits: Image by London 2012

London Olympics Won’t Allow Sharing of Photos and Video via Social Networks

Photographers have already lodged complaints against the security firm that tried to prevent them from taking photos of the Olympic sites from public land, but it seems that even stricter rules will be imposed on ticket holders once the games begin. According to a freelance photographer named Peter Ruck, the Olympic organizing committee Locog intends to prevent attendees from uploading images and videos captured at the games to social networks.
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Olympics’ Security Guards Trained to Hinder Photographers

The Olympics are a big deal, and an even bigger opportunity for the country’s photographers. From the moment the next Olympic city is announced, preparations begin and an endless number of photo ops present themselves. That is, if the security guards don’t start harassing you.
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