Posts Tagged ‘london’

Amazing Color Footage of Britain from the 1920s

About a month ago, we shared some stunning footage that showed what London was like all the way back in 1926. The original filming was done by Claude Friese-Greene, whose father William invented the ‘Biocolour‘ technique of capturing color film footage.

That particular video was a compilation of snippets that Friese-Greene had filmed in London when he returned form a 2-year journey. He called the final product The Open Road, and it was a 26-part series that took him all over Britain. Fortunately for us, much of it has now been digitized and uploaded bit-by-bit to YouTube by The BFI National Archive. Read more…

DigitalRev Pits Film Vs Digital in a 36-Hour Photo Tour of London

For their most recent international foray, the DigitalRev producers decided to send Kai, Lok and Alamby on a 36-hour trek across London to take photos. They were tasked with travelling to and photographing 10 of London’s best known landmarks, using old film SLRs on day one, and digital cameras the next. Read more…

Old Color Footage Shows What London Looked Like Back in 1926

Want to see what London looked like back in the year 1926? Check out this beautiful color footage shot in various London locations by Claude Friese-Greene, an early British pioneer of film. Frisse-Greene created a series of travelogues nearly 90 years ago using a color process developed by his father William Friese-Greene.
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A Visual Journey That Shows the Cookie-Cutter Facades of Homes in London

cookiecutter

When photographer Callum Cooper moved from Melbourne, Australia to London, England, one of the things that caught his eye was the uniformity (or “conformity”) seen in the city’s residential areas. Along a street, multiple buildings would have exactly the same architecture, and if it weren’t for the minor differences in the facades, some of them can hardly be distinguished from one another.

Cooper then came up with the idea of exploring this phenomenon using photographs — photos that would become a “structuralist film.”
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320-Gigapixel London Panorama Breaks Record for Largest Panoramic Photo

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The BT Tower panorama, created by stitching together 48,640 images taken with 7 Canon EOS 7Ds, has officially broken the record for the world’s largest panoramic photo. It was taken from atop the BT Tower in London, and you can see a tiny version of it at the top, but the real thing offers a massive, browsable 360-degree view of London in extreme detail. Read more…

David Burnett’s Speed Graphic Photos of the London 2012 Olympics

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Last August, we wrote about how renowned photojournalist David Burnett was spotted using a large format camera at the London Olympics. If you’ve been wondering how the photographs turned out, today’s your lucky day.

Here’s an inside look at how Burnett’s project came to be, and the beautiful images that resulted.
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London’s Incredible Diversity Captured In Photos of Bus Stops

Between 2001 and 2005, photographer Richard Hooker visited various bus stops across London and shot film photographs of the people waiting for their rides to arrive. The 136 photographs he captured show the city’s incredible cultural diversity, explore how people relate to one another in confined spaces, and offer small peeks into personal lives.
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Canon’s Drool-Worthy Gear Room at the London Olympics

Canon Olympics Camera Gear Room

Welcome to camera gear heaven: here’s a glimpse inside the Canon Professional Services office at the London 2012 Olympics. It’s a room that’s absolutely stuffed with cameras, lenses, and accessories from floor to ceiling. The Canon 1D X hasn’t been released to the general public yet, but this room has hundreds of them!
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Olympic Opening Ceremony Participant Captures Inside View with Hidden Camera

Update: The video is no longer available. Apparently the Olympic Committee is cracking down on unauthorized videos.


Want to see what it was like to be a participant in the opening ceremony of the London Olympics? One 26-year-old participant decided to build a hidden camera into his/her costume, capturing this awesome footage showing a performer’s perspective of the show.

Olympic Security Firm Under Fire Again for Refusing to Clarify Photography Rules

Photographically speaking, the London Olympics have caused quite a bit of confusion for ticket holders. Initially, the ticket holder agreement seemed to imply that you wouldn’t be allowed to upload any of the photos taken at the games to social networks; then once the rules were clarified, a size limit was set in place, but only in certain venues, outdoor venues were promised to be “more lenient;” and now it seems that Wembley Stadium (pictured above), where all of the Olympic soccer matches will be held, will not be allowing any “professional-style cameras [any camera with interchangeable lenses] or recording/transmitting devices.” Read more…