Posts Tagged ‘lifehack’

Collect Box Tabs for a Neat Way to Track How Much Film You Shoot

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Want to know how much film you and your camera are chewing through? John Sypal over at tokyo camera style does this by collecting box tabs. Regarding the photos above, he writes,

This is compiled from the box tabs of every single roll/pack of film I shot in 2012.

Since 2001 I’ve kept a tab from every roll of film I’ve shot in the backs of collage-based photographic journals. In the mid-2000’s I was shooting some 500 rolls a year- I’ve cut back to about 300 or so the past two years. A complete visual collection of all the box-tabs from the past dozen years would result in a much larger image.

It’s like a stamp or sticker collection book for photographers. You can find a larger collage of the photos above here.


P.S. A giant poster-sized collage of box tabs might make for a pretty wild home decor item.

Use Science to Become More Productive as a Photographer

Want to learn how to be more productive with your photography? Instead of simply “trying harder” and relying on your willpower, a better way may be to take simple steps that have been shown to be effective by science. The above 3-minute video, created by artists/educators Mitchell Moffit and Gregory Brown, offers some tips that science has taught us about being more efficient at working and spending less time getting our work accomplished.
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Squeeze Extra Prints Out of Your Inkjet Photo Printer Using a Hair Dryer

Here’s a clever trick for if you ever need to print out a photo but find your inkjet cartridges low (or dried out): bust out your hair dryer. Paul Boutin of The New York Times writes,

If your printer’s ink cartridge runs dry near the end of an important print job, remove the cartridge and run a hair dryer on it for two to three minutes. Then place the cartridge back into the printer and try again while it is still warm.

“The heat from the hair dryer heats the thick ink, and helps it to flow through the tiny nozzles in the cartridge,” says Alex Cox, a software engineer in Seattle. “When the cartridge is almost dead, those nozzles are often nearly clogged with dried ink, so helping the ink to flow will let more ink out of the nozzles.” The hair dryer trick can squeeze a few more pages out of a cartridge after the printer declares it is empty.

The trick only works once or twice per cartridge, but apparently it works pretty well.

(via Lifehacker)

Create a Sawed-Off, Clip-On Paintbrush for Easy Camera Cleaning

If you regularly shoot in dusty or sandy environments, here’s a handy tip for keeping your camera clean: create a simple cleaning brush that attaches to your camera bag. Digital Camera World writes,

You’ll never bag a great photo with dirty lenses and dusty gear, so keeping your camera and lenses clean and protected is crucial. The front line of defence against dirt and grime is constant cleaning. This isn’t easy if you have to carry around cans of compressed air, blower brushes, fluids and other bulky equipment. Professionals actually tend to use ordinary paintbrushes for camera and lens cleaning, so save yourself money and space [by] making a handy cleaning brush that clips onto your belt.

You’ll need a hacksaw and a drill to “hack” a 25mm paintbrush, and a split-ring and carabiner for attaching it to your camera bag or backpack.

Keep Your Camera Clean with This Homemade Brush [Digital Camera World]


P.S. The magazine also suggests attaching double-sided sticky pads (or tape) to the inside of your lens caps to trap dust that’s floating around in your camera bag.

How to Use Your iPhone as a Quick and Easy Negative Viewer

If you do any darkroom work, you probably regularly print contact sheets to peek at the positive versions of your B&W negative film strips. Did you know that your iPhone can be used as a quick an easy tool for this same purpose?
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Instead of Selling Your Old Stroller, Use it to Haul Around Camera Gear

Don’t have any more babies to transport? Old strollers can be repurposed as a way to wheel your camera gear from place to place. Just load it up with your camera bag, tripod, lighting equipment, and accessories, and you’ll have yourself a mobile mini studio.
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Trick: Easily Set Photos to “Private” in iOS by Cropping Them Down

If you own an iOS device, you’ve probably noticed that the Camera Roll in the native Photos app doesn’t come with any way to mark photographs as private. For this reason, the App Store features a large number of apps (both paid and free) designed to offer that feature, allowing you to choose what to show and what not to when someone else is flipping through your photographs. If you want an easy way to “mark photos as private” without having to download a special app (or pay money for a fancy one), Amit Agarwal over at Digital Inspiration offers this simple trick: crop them.
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Using Photos to Communicate While in a Foreign Country

Preparing for a trip to a foreign country where you don’t know the language? If you don’t have an Internet-connected phone handy, a camera can help you out. Redditor Jhojgaard regularly travels to various countries around the world, and suggests that storing some key photos on your camera can come in handy when you’re in a communication crunch.

Things that are useful to store on your memory card include the names of places you need to get to and common things you might need (e.g. a certain subway station, the restroom, a taxi). If you have a smartphone with you, you can toss all of the “translation photos” into a separate album.
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Use Wax Paper to Plan Out Your Picture Frame Layout on the Ground

If you’re planning to hang a bunch of picture frames on a wall, Marissa Waddell of Roost suggests laying them out on the ground to figure out frame placement. Once you’re happy with how the frames look, simply take a large sheet of wax paper and outline the frames. The paper can then be used as a guide for where to hammer in nails on the wall, giving you the exact layout you came up with.

Another Take on the Gallery Wall (via Lifehacker)

Use a Nail and Clothespin to Determine Placement When Hanging Photos

Michele over at The Scrap Shoppe offers this handy trick for hanging picture frames: hammer a nail through a clothespin and use it to determine nail placement. Simply hang the picture on the clothespin nail, figure out where you want to place the frame, and then push the clothespin into the wall to make a small indent. Voila! Target acquired.

Picture Frame Hanging Tip (via Lifehacker)


P.S. Last month we shared a similar trick that uses toothpaste.


Image credits: Photographs by Michele/The Scrap Shoppe