Posts Tagged ‘lego’

Working Medium Format Camera Created with Lego Blocks

Fernando Ramírez Martínez (snipfer on Flickr) created this awesomely geeky medium format camera using Lego pieces.

We started sorting bricks out and after a couple of afternoons working on the camera obscura we managed to get some shots out of the thing. It was built using Lego pieces, duct tape, black cardboard and some glue. The camera shoots 6×6 and the “lens” sports a focal length of 150mm with an aperture of 1:300. All measurements approximate.

In the front there is the shutter and the pinhole. In the back, the gear on the left is the film advance. The white gear on the right has a clutched axis that prevents the film spool from moving freely. The “suspension” does not allow the film advance to turn backwards.

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Working Leica M8 Created Using Lego

Behold — A Leica M8 camera created using Lego bricks! Schfio Factory this awesome toy camera using a $50 pink Lego digital camera and carefully building bricks around it to turn into Leica look-alike. It shoots at 3 megapixels and holds up to 80 photographs on its internal memory. Sweet.
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Simple and Creative Mixing of Lego and the Real World

London filmmaker Temujin Doran created this great little video for Lego that doesn’t involve any flashy effects or fancy camera techniques — just a child-like imagination. It won a prize at the prestigious Cannes Lions advertising festival in 2010.

This concept would work great with other toys and small objects, and can obviously be done as a series of photos as well.

Pentax Embraces Customizability with LEGO-Style Blocks and Skins

Pentax is trying all sorts of ways to differentiate its cameras from the 800-pound gorillas in the camera market, and apparently thinks customization is the best way to go. After allowing customizer the colors on traditionally boring-looking DSLRs with their K-x, they’ve just announced two new compact cameras that allow users to choose their own style.
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Famous Photos Redone with LEGO

Classics in Lego is a super creative project by Mike Stimpson in which he recreates famous photographs using Legos.

Dalí Atomicus



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DIY LEGO Nikon Remote for $7 Plus Time

Instructables member KoZuEst made his own remote for his sister’s Nikon D60 with a LEGO and a bit of electrical know-how. He says the total cost of materials, not including the circuit board and his time, was around $7 — as opposed to spending ~$40 for a Nikon remote. Not bad!

If you’ve got the urge to unleash your inner electrical engineer, check out his instructions here.

(via Instructables)

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Neat Photomosaic iPhone App by LEGO

LEGO recently released a free iPhone app that turns your photographs into photomosaics made with 1×1 LEGO pieces. The app obviously isn’t limited to faces, but can turn anything into a LEGO mosaic.

Sadly, LEGO didn’t integrate a way that allows you to quickly order the exact number of pieces of each color required to create the mosaics you create. That feature would have made the app much more useful and profitable for LEGO, especially if the app takes off.

Download from iTunes (via designboom)

A Polaroid Camera LEGO Needs to Offer

If you’re a fan of Polaroid instant film, then 2010 might soon become a great year for you. The classic instant film format is making a comeback through the Impossible Project, so it might be time to dust off your old Polaroid cameras (if the redesigned format is compatible, that is).

To trigger some nostalgia and anticipation for the film’s comeback, the above photograph is a Polaroid 1000 camera built with LEGO blocks. Sadly, the camera doesn’t work, and only spits out pretend photos. However, with the number of people who love both Polaroid and LEGOs, a working version of this thing would surely be on everyone’s wishlist the instant it’s released.

LEGO Polaroid (via MAKE)