Posts Tagged ‘lego’

Add a Simple Lens Cap Mount to a Tripod Using LEGO Squares

lenscaptripod1

Last week, we wrote on how you can use LEGO pieces to keep your lens caps on your camera strap when they’re not protecting your lenses. A reader named Fearn quickly pointed us to a similar tip published over at Sugru at the end of last year. Instead of using camera straps, however, they suggest tripods as a sturdy way of keeping track of the caps.
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Make a Simple DIY Lens Cap Holder Using Two Thin LEGO Pieces

legolenscap

Flickr photographer RawSniper1 has a clever way of holding onto his lens caps when they’re not attached to the front of his lenses: he uses LEGO pieces. By attaching one thin 2×4 piece permanently to the top of his lens cap and one thin 2×8 piece to his camera strap, he created a simple DIY lens cap holder system.

The lens cap has been in the photo-industry news quite a bit over the past year, with companies developing new shock absorbing caps, Canon switching over to pinch-style caps, and a constant stream of new lens cap holder concepts. Besides using your pocket (the obvious solution), RawSniper1′s tip is one of the simplest and cheapest we’ve seen yet.

Lego Gear [Flickr via DIYPhotography]


Image credit: lego_gear by RawSniper1

A Homemade Autochrome Camera Made with Lego, Cardboard, and Duct Tape

Photographer Dominique Vankan wanted to play around with the old Autochrome Lumière process from the early 1900s, so he built himself a custom large format camera using LEGO pieces, cardboard, and duct tape.
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Fuuvi Nanoblock Digital Camera Lets You Build Your Own Toy Camera, LEGO Style

Nanoblock is a plastic building block system that’s like a shrunk-down version of LEGO. It has been growing in popularity as of late, and may soon become a fad on the level of Buckyballs. Japanese novelty photo company Fuuvi has partnered up with Nanoblock for a new toy digital camera that can take on all kinds of custom shapes and designs.
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A Nifty Panoramic Pinhole Camera Made with LEGO Blocks

We’ve featured large format LEGO cameras before, but what about wide format? Photographer Giacomo Citti created this panoramic LEGO pinhole camera that features a sliding shutter and film winders on the sides.
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Time-Lapse of a Man Sorting 65,000 LEGO Blocks Over 71 Hours

Stop-motion projects often require mind-blowing amounts of work and preparation. Just how mind-blowing? Music duo Daniel Larsson and Tomas Redigh (AKA Rymdreglage) recently poured out 100 boxes of LEGO pieces that each contained 650 blocks. They then had two cameras snap a photo every 20 seconds as they spent a whopping 71 hours sorting by color. The time-lapse video was created using the 12,775 photos that each memory card ended up with.
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White Leica M8 Faithfully Recreated Using LEGO Pieces

H.Y. Leung recreated the special white edition of the Leica M8 rangefinder using LEGO pieces. The attention to detail is amazing, and you can even look through the viewfinder! You can find a couple more photos here.

Lego Leica M8 (via Highsnobiety)


Image credit: Photographs by Mr.Attacki

LEGO Rooms Photographed to Look like Full-Sized Spaces

Remember those beautiful macro photos that showed the inside of musical instruments as giant rooms? Sao Paolo, Brazil-based photographer Valentino Fialdini did something similar, except instead of musical instruments he used small chambers created out of LEGO blocks. With some clever lighting and camera trickery, Fialdini captured the tiny rooms and corridors as to look like giant architectural spaces.
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Amazing Surfing Photos Shot Using Ink and a LEGO Figurine

Italian photographer Alberto Seveso has a wonderful series of surfing photographs titled “Ink Riders” shot using blue ink, water, and a LEGO figurine. It’s an incredibly creative twist on the popular “ink in water” project.
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Photos of Famous Cartoon Characters in Minimalist LEGO Form

German ad agency Jung von Matt created this brilliant series of photographs for a LEGO advertising campaign titled “Imagine”. The images show famous characters from children’s television shows in simplified LEGO form. Can you figure out each of the shows?
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