Posts Tagged ‘learn’

How to Retouch Portraits Without Losing Skin Texture with Frequency Separation

Here’s a great introductory retouching tutorial by photographer Sara Kiesling, who writes,

Basic skin retouching using frequency separation and dodging & burning. I use this process on every photo that I do, and I usually spend about 4-5 minutes on headshots like this (and less time on full body shots when there is obviously less detail in the face). This is not intended to be a high-end retouching tutorial, but techniques that can help people who want to do natural-looking retouching while maintaining most of the natural skin texture!

Frequency separation is a technique that allows you to give skin a smooth-yet-sharp look.
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A Graphical Comparison of Mirrorless Camera Sensors Sizes

Mirrorless cameras feature sensors larger than compact cameras and bodies smaller than DSLRs, but how do their sensor sizes compare with one another? To give you a better idea of how formats such as Nikon CX and Olympus/Panasonic Four Thirds stack up against each other, Digital Camera Database created this helpful graphic showing the relative sizes of each format.
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18 Facts of Life for Photography Students

Every year, I go to my alma mater and give a lecture for 3rd-year advertising-photography students on the business of photography. At this two-hour lectures, I cover all sorts of points about the ups and downs of being a busy commercial photographer in NYC, and also try to tell them straight facts of what the “real world” is like. Here is a summary of some of the most important words of wisdom I try to pass on to young photographers.
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Fascinating Facts About How Humans Perceive and React to Color

Unless you only shoot in monochrome, color likely plays a huge part in the experience of viewing your photographs. You may be aware of how you use them, but do you know how the colors in your images affect the people that look at them? PBS Off Book put out this fascinating video today that explores just how powerful colors are.
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A Great Graphic for Understanding How ISO, Aperture, and Shutter Speed Work

Check out this awesome exposure triangle graphic found in this Exposure Guide tutorial on the fundamentals of exposure:

When these three elements are combined, they represent a given exposure value (EV) for a given setting. Any change in any one of the three elements will have a measurable and specific impact on how the remaining two elements react to expose the film frame or image sensor and how the image ultimately looks. For example, if you increase the f-stop, you decrease the size of the lens’ diaphragm thus reducing the amount of light hitting the image sensor, but also increasing the DOF (depth of field) in the final image. Reducing the shutter speed affects how motion is captured, in that this can cause the background or subject to become blurry. However, reducing shutter speed (keeping the shutter open longer) also increases the amount of light hitting the image sensor, so everything is brighter. Increasing the ISO, allows for shooting in lower light situations, but you increase the amount of digital noise inherent in the photo. It is impossible to make an independent change in one of the elements and not obtain an opposite effect in how the other elements affect the image, and ultimately change the EV.

If you’re just starting out in photography, do yourself a favor and work through the Photography Basics page over on Exposure Guide. It’s a fantastic resource.

Exposure – ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed Explained [Exposure Guide via Reddit]

A Simple Explanation of the Metering and AE-Lock Features in Your DSLR

Want a better understanding of how the metering and AE-lock features in your DSLR camera work? YouTube photography tutorial channel PhotoUniverse made this simple explanation that explains the concepts using a whiteboard. He quickly steps through evaluative (which uses a database of many “known” photos) and center-weighted metering before spending a good amount of time explaining spot metering and how you can use it in conjunction with AE-Lock to properly expose photographs.

If you’re already adept at handling your DSLR, you probably won’t learn anything new, but this video is great for anyone that’s just starting to dip their toes into more serious photography.

(via PhotoUniverse via Reddit)


P.S. He also shares a common trick used by many photographers for metering on a sunny day: green grass can often work nicely as an 18% gray card.

Great Two-Hour Lectures on How to Use Photoshop and Lightroom

Looking for free lessons on how to get started with using Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom to post-process your photographs? Look no further than the official YouTube channel of New York City camera shop B&H Photo Video. The store often invites well-known professional photographers to hold lectures on subjects they’re knowledgable in and passionate about. The collection of videos aren’t as shared as other shorter tutorial videos you’ll find online due to their great lengths — they run up to two hours each — but they’re fantastic resources for learning the ins and outs of photography.

In the video above, photographer Tim Grey offers an overview of using Photoshop CS6 for optimizing your photos. His topics include adjustment layers, image cleanup tools, cropping, rotating, correcting perspective, and applying local adjustments.
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A Facebook Timeline Showing the History of the Photograph

If the photograph was a living person, what would his Facebook timeline look like? Photo aggregation service Pixable decided to answer this question, creating a giant infographic on the history of the photograph with the layout of a Facebook timeline. It all starts at the very bottom of the timeline, with the photograph’s birth at around 1000 AD. Over the years, we see the marriage he has with Kodak, the Kodachrome process born to the couple a few decades later, and a subsequent relationship she has with Digital Camera.
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Inspiring Photographer Talks @Google

On of the neat things about working at Google is the fact that the company loves letting its employees hear from the world’s best minds through the AtGoogleTalks. Through the series of lectures, Google invites well-known individuals to share on their area of expertise for 40-70 minutes. In addition to the thousands of politicians, musicians, and entertainers who have shared so far, there have also been a number of photographers invited for Photographers@Google presentations.

The video above shows a lecture given by HDR landscape photographer Trey Ratcliff last year.
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The Basics of Flash Photography Taught Using a Garden Hose

Photography instructor Mike Browne of PhotographyCourses.Biz has a clever way of teaching the basic principles of flash photography. He uses water from an ordinary garden hose as an analogy for light, showing different ways you can go about soaking your portrait subject.
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