Posts Tagged ‘lcd’

That’s No Way to Treat a Perfectly Good Viewfinder!

45046403_daecc27322_z

Living in a tourist town like San Francisco, I have frequent opportunities to observe how people use their cameras. Inevitably, these lead to “Why, oh why?” moments in which advanced technology collides with general cluelessness.
Read more…

Nikon’s Service Center Can “Change” the Green Tint on Your D800

greentint

Back in April, there was a small hoopla amongst Nikonians who purchased the Nikon D4 or D800 and discovered that the LCD screen had a greenish tint when compared to the D3s and D700. Nikon denied that anything was wrong with the new cameras, and stated that it was actually the older models that were too cool. A couple of months later, it was rumored that a soon-to-arrive firmware update would address the issue. That update has yet to arrive.

There’s now some good news for those of you looking for a fix “change”. Photographer Noah Bershatsky is reporting that Nikon’s service center will actually do the correction “change”.
Read more…

ClearViewer: A Folding High-Diopter Lens That Turns Your LCD Into an EVF

ClearViewer is the compact camera’s equivalent of a DSLR viewfinder attachment. It’s a folding high-diopter lens that lets you use your compact camera’s LCD screen as an electronic viewfinder by putting your eye less than 2 inches away from the screen. This lets you see fine details in the shot, make precise manual focus adjustments, and avoid the problem of glare.
Read more…

Casio QV-10: The First Digital Camera that Offered an LCD Screen and Live View

Did you know that LCD screens and live view didn’t arrive until a number of years after digital cameras hit the market? The first consumer digital camera that featured those technologies was the Casio QV-10 (seen above), which hit store shelves in 1995. However, the screen was purely for framing shots, not for eyeballing exposure, and it took roughly 10 years for live view as we know it to become ubiquitous.

The first prosumer camera to use live view for both exposure control and preview framing was the fixed-lens Canon PowerShot G1 from 2000, although this was still in the line of compact cameras.

The first DSLR to use live view for framing preview only was the fixed-lens Olympus E-10 from 2000. The first interchangeable-lens DSLR to use a live preview was the Fujifilm FinePix S3 Pro, which was launched in October 2004. Its “Live Image” mode could display a live, black-and-white preview of the subject that could be magnified for manual focusing purposes, although the preview was limited to a duration of thirty seconds. [...] The first general-use interchangeable-lens DSLR with live view for framing preview only was the Olympus E-330 of 2006. The first general-use interchangeable-lens DSLRs with live view for both exposure simulated preview and framing preview were the Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III and Canon EOS 40D of 2007.

Just in case you were wondering, the terms “live view” and “live preview” are interchangeable.

Live Preview on Wikipedia (via Casio via NPhoto)

LCD Viewfinder Loupe Made Using a Child Binocular Toy

Alan Morris created a DIY LCD viewfinder loupe by slicing the viewfinder off a pair of child binoculars and building the loupe using plexiglass. The total cost came out to about $10-15. It’s a bit wobbly when not in use, but that just gives it character, right?

(via CheesyCam)

Digital Cameras With Detached LCDs

We’ve been seeing this idea floating around in concept cameras and new camera accessories, so it might be a coming trend in digital photography: detached LCD screens.

Xi Zhu Concept Camera

This isn’t an actual product, but rather a concept camera by designer Xi Zhu. The idea is that while the LCD and camera are normally held together with magnets, the LCD can also be detached and held by the subject of the photograph, allowing them to instantly view the photos, and delete those they don’t approve of. The photographer shoots through the optical viewfinder, and doesn’t actually get to see the resulting photographs, delegating chimping responsibilities to the subject.

Pixel LV-WI Wireless Live View Remote Control

Unlike the above concept, LV-W1 Wireless Live View Remote Control by Pixel Enterprise Limited is an actual product you can buy for your DSLR (for $335). Though the photographer can still see instant feedback on their camera, the remote receives the Live View wireless through the 2.4GHz band and displays it on a 3 inch screen. It works by attaching a transmitter to the camera’s hotshoe, and allows you to operate the shutter remotely.

This can also be done through your iPhone or iPod Touch using onOne Software’s DSLR Camera Remote application, though this app requires wifi and a laptop.

(via Yanko Design and Engadget)


Thanks for the tip @eugenephoto!

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

Read moreā€¦