Posts Tagged ‘largeformat’

How to Create a Homemade Large Format Pinhole Camera Using a Shoebox

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This camera is a poor man’s large format camera. It is made with a simple shoebox acting as a dark room.
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David Burnett: Stories from a Seasoned Photojournalism Legend

David Burnett is a traditional photojournalist whose style and work has remained relevant in an increasingly digital world. You may remember his stunning shots from the London 2012 Olympic Games that were captured, not with a 1DX, but a 4×5 Speed Graphic camera and Aerial reconnaissance lens, both from the 1940s.

But Burnett’s incredible photography has graced newspapers and magazine covers for decades. And in this B&H Event Space presentation, he regales us with some stories from the journey that took him from shooting local basketball games in high school with a Yashica Mat and a one-off Highland Strobe, to shooting for the cover of Time magazine with his Speed Graphic.

(via ISO 1200)

This Handmade 20×24-Inch View Camera Has Eight-Foot Bellows

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Earlier this week, we shared how photography student Mark Hilton has been hard at work constructing a 20×16-inch ultra-large-format camera by hand. If you found that impressive, get a load of photographer Tim Pearse’s handmade 20×24-inch view camera.
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Civil War Reenactments Photographed with a Large Format Pinhole Camera

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To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, photographer Michael Falco is shooting a project titled “Civil War 150 Pinhole Project.” His goal is to highlight the haunting beauty of civil war battlefields and to chronicle the various battle reenactments that are happening all across the country. To do so, he’s using large format pinhole cameras that gives the poetic images an old fashioned look.
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Building a 20×16-Inch Ultra-Large-Format Camera by Hand

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South East England-based photography student Mark Hilton came up with an ambitious New Year’s resolution this year: he’s in the process of building his own 20×16 “ultra-large-format” camera by hand. It’s a camera that’s designed to expose Ilford Harman Direct Positive paper.
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David Burnett’s Speed Graphic Photos of the London 2012 Olympics

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Last August, we wrote about how renowned photojournalist David Burnett was spotted using a large format camera at the London Olympics. If you’ve been wondering how the photographs turned out, today’s your lucky day.

Here’s an inside look at how Burnett’s project came to be, and the beautiful images that resulted.
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Clyde Butcher Talks About His Journey to Massive Black-and-White Photography

Photographer Clyde Butcher shoots big photos, and we mean big. He develops large format black-and-white prints that range in size from your standard 8″x10″ all the way up to 5×8… feet! This phenomenal photographer’s journey and the type of photography he’s become famous for are an inspiration to the people out there who want to see the extent to which the medium can be pushed. Read more…

Repurpose Your Unwanted Film Holders as Picture Frames

Do you have old large format film holders lying around that you no longer have any use for? You can breathe new life into them by transforming them into nifty picture frames.
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Layers of Light and Time Captured on Single Frames Using a 4×5 Camera

London-based photographer Tony Ellwood has a project called In No Time that deals with our perception and awareness of our passage of time. All the photographs are of the same pier on a beach that Ellwood visited over a period of six months. His technique, which took him 18 months to develop and perfect, involves visiting the location multiple times for each photo — sometimes up to three times a day for multiple days. Using a 4×5 large format camera, Ellwood creates each exposure across multiple sessions, as if he were doing multiple exposure photography, but of a single subject and scene. Each exposure time ranges from a few seconds to multiple hours.
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Shooting with the First Lot of Impossible’s New 8×10 Large Format Instant Film

San Diego-based photographer Tim Mantoani, the guy who shot giant Polaroid photos of famous photographers holding their works, recently got his hands on Lot #1 of The Impossible Project’s new 8×10 instant film. To test it out, Mantoani busted out his large format camera and 8×10 processor, and then visited a local surf shop to create a multi-shot panorama.
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