Posts Tagged ‘kit’

A Peek Inside the Camera Bag of a Getty Photographer at the Olympics

What would you pack in your camera bag to shoot the biggest sporting event in the world? PopPhoto has a great interview with Getty photographer Streeter Lecka in which he talks about preparing for (and shooting) the Olympics in London. His daily-basis kit includes two Canon 1D Xs, a 400mm f/2.8, two 70-200mm (f/2.8 and f/4), a 16-35mm f/2.8, and a 15mm fisheye. Here’s how his images are beamed to headquarters:

Getty has our own lines that are hardwired into every single event. Our tech crew came over months before to get an idea of where we’d be shooting. We can just plug in and send from there. The editors are in the media center where they can send it out immediately.

I have a backpack everyday with a computer and a card reader. When I plug it into the wire, push in the card, and press start, it automatically sends everything to the editors. Everything transfers to my computer as well. I also bring a separate little hard drive so I can back up everything I shoot for myself. If I want an original RAW file, I can get it if I want to.

Lecka says he expects to snap 2,000-4,000 photos a day on average.

Shooting The Olympics: Inside The Camera Bag Of Getty Photographer Streeter Lecka [PopPhoto]

Your Own Personal Google Street View Camera Kit

Contrary to popular belief, Google can’t be everywhere at once (they’re working on it), and one of the most obvious examples of this limitation is the extent of Street View functionality in Google Maps. Of course, tons of roads and even some obscure neighborhoods have been mapped out with street view, but all too often your own front yard is left un-street-viewable. And while that may not be much of a tragedy for most people, those that would rather change that now have the option to with DIY Street View’s new Street View Camera System. Read more…

40+ Essential Items Every Photography Assistant Needs Now

Los Angeles-based photographer and photo assistant Shawn Corrigan has spent the past 10 years traveling the world assisting and shooting. Over time, he has developed an “everything but the kitchen sink, plus the kitchen sink” kit that he brings to each set. In addition to the absolutely essential leatherman and light meter that every assistant should carry around, here’s a checklist of others things you should consider packing.
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Polaroid and The Impossible Project Team Up, Release Paper Camera Kit

The Impossible Project and Polaroid have teamed up to launch the Polaroid Classic line. Every year the two companies will be collaborating on 6-10 Polaroid Classic branded products. Guess what the first product is? A DIY paper camera kit!

Build your own Polaroid camera classics! This Do It Yourself craft set makes you the proud owner of six legendary, analog instant camera replicas (see the Specs tab for the included camera models). The paper models of classic Polaroid cameras are fun to create and perfect in every detail, including mini faux Polaroid photos that develop when rubbed.

Tiny Polaroid pictures that develop when you rub them? That’s certainly fancier than Matthew Nicholson’s papercraft Polaroid camera (on the other hand, Nicholson’s can take actual pinhole photos).

Polaroid Classic (via Photojojo)


P.S. They’re also teaming up to sell off the last batch of Polaroid film ever produced.

Camera Obscura Kit For Setting Up Your Own Room-Sized Camera

Want to turn your room into giant camera obscura? Photographer Justin Quinnell (whose work we featured back in June) has created a Camera Obscura Kit that makes the conversion easy. Each kit contains a projection lens, a mount template, velcro tape, a projection sheet, and a handheld screen. They cost £25 apiece over on Quinnell’s website.

Camera Obscura Kit (via phototuts+)

Snap Model Kit Lets You Build a Working 35mm Camera

Forget model airplanes… This Plamodel snap model kit is the one to buy if you’re a photo-enthusiast (or want to make your kid one). Created by Japanese design house superheadz, it uses simple snap-together parts that allow even the “not-so-mechanically inclined” to assemble their own 35mm camera. There’s 44 individual parts, and an instruction manual for building the camera is available online. You can check out some sample photos in this Flickr group pool, and buy one for $17 over on Amazon.

Plamodel Do-it-Yourself 35mm Camera (via PSFK)

Cheap DSLR Follow Focus Kit that Lets You Remember Focus Points

DSLR Solutions has a new follow focus kit that allows you to keep track of focus points without being bulky or expensive. The $60 kit is basically a clamp, a velcro strap, and some metal markers that attach to the strap. Attaching the markers allows you to bounce between focus points, or keep track of a number of points if you have multiple subjects. We’ve featured a number of DIY follow focus solutions here in the past, but using a velcro strap and markers is something we haven’t seen before.
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LensCapTrap Helps the Absent Minded Keep Track of Lens Caps

If you’re the kind of person that constantly misplaces your lens caps after removing them to shoot (Psst! You can ditch them in favor of UV filters), the LensCapTrap can help you hold on to them. It’s an uber simple kit that allows you to attach your lens caps to your camera strap using Velcro, avoiding the annoyance of having your caps dangle like they do with the popular string-style holder. The standard kit costs $6 and provides Velcro patches for two lens caps, though creating your own do-it-yourself version shouldn’t be too difficult either.

Sharan Cardboard Pinhole Camera Kits

Sharan pinhole cameras are Japanese-made cardboard camera kits that you buy and build yourself. All the parts are pre-cut, and can be assembled using tape in about 1 to 2 hours with the help of step-by-step instructions. The STD35 is a standard 35mm pinhole camera, while the Wide-35 allows you to take panoramic photos.
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DSLR Kit for a Three Month Project Around the World

Gail Mooney and her daughter Erin Kelly are about to embark on a three month documentary project around the world using Canon DSLRs, and the above photograph shows the kit they’re bringing along. Check out this blog post to see everything they’re bringing. What’s amazing is that everything here fits inside two backpacks. Whoa.

The resulting film will be titled, “Opening Our Eyes”, and you can follow along on this blog.

(via cinema5D)