Posts Tagged ‘kinect’

New ‘Nano-Camera’ from MIT Sees Things at the Speed of Light, Costs Only $500

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A super-fast, affordable new camera currently under development at MIT could improve everything from video game experiences to driving safety, researchers reported at a recent tech convention. Read more…

Capture HD Video with Depth Using a DSLR and Microsoft Kinect

RGBDToolkit is a project that layers HD video recording with a DSLR over Microsoft Kinect’s depth maps, creating trippy 3D footage that may be an indication of what we’ll be documenting life with in the future.
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Starry Portraits Shot Using an Infrared Camera and a Microsoft Kinect

“Dancing with Invisible Light” is a project by San Francisco-based photographer Audrey Penven, who used an infrared camera to capture portraits illuminated by the invisible structured light emitted by a Microsoft Kinect.

With these images I was exploring the unique photographic possibilities presented by using a Microsoft Kinect as a light source. The Kinect – an inexpensive videogame peripheral – projects a pattern of infrared dots known as “structured light”. Invisible to the eye, this pattern can be captured using an infrared camera. The Kinect uses the deformation of this dot pattern to derive 3D information about its subjects (an ability which has already spawned an explosion of incredible digital art).

As a photographer I am most interested in the nature and quality of light: how light behaves in the physical world, and how it interacts with and affects the subjects that it illuminates. For this shoot my models and I were essentially working blind, with the results visible only after each image was captured. Together, we explored the unique physicality of structured light, finding our way in the darkness by touch and intuition. Dancing with invisible light.

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Minority Report-style Interface for Viewing Gigapixel Photos

Gigalinc is an “immersive photography” project by University of Lincoln student Samuel Cox that allows people to explore gigapixel photographs on a giant display using arm movements and hand gestures. Using an Xbox Kinect sensor for motion detection and a large cinema display, the resulting user interface is strikingly similar to the interface Tom Cruise uses in Minority Report.

(via TechCrunch)