Posts Tagged ‘joemcnally’

How Joe McNally, Jeremy Cowart and Ami Vitale are Making the Next 6 Months Count

Photo by David duChemin

It’s hard to believe we’re already halfway through 2014, right? But the good news is there’s still over 200 days left to bring in business, make more connections with potential photo clients, and end the year strong. To help you out and provide a little inspiration, we’ve also launched PhotoShelter’s Guide to Conquer the Rest of 2014 — a compilation of our best business advice to help you make the next six months count.

On top of that, we also wanted to know what some of the most seasoned photographers are doing to rev up their businesses before the year is up. Are they focusing on marketing? Reworking their websites? New projects? To find out, we caught up with a few top photographers including Joe McNally, Jeremy Cowart, Ami Vitale, David duChemin, Stacy Pearsall, Dixie Dixon, and Gary Arndt to ask one question: How do you plan to grow your photo business over the next six months? Read more…

Joe McNally Shares Some Incredibly Useful Lighting & Basic Photography Tips

Joe McNally knows a good bit more about lighting than many photographers out there, and in this short video he shares a great deal of information pertaining to both TTL flash lighting as well as adapting to a situation and using natural light. Read more…

Nikon Launches New ‘Behind the Scenes’ Instructional Video Series

Nikon USA has just joined the Google+ community, and eager as they are to make a positive impression and not seem like they’re arriving empty-handed, the company has simultaneously debuted a new 15-part instructional video series for beginners on up who like their educational content with a side of Nikon advertising. Read more…

Joe McNally, Lynn Goldsmith and Bob Krist on Shooting with the Nikon Df

First comes hype, then comes the announcement, and last comes the post-release marketing. In regards to the Nikon Df, we’ve officially moved into the last of those three steps, and right on cue, Nikon has released three videos of big time photographers endorsing the Df by talking about their experiences shooting with it. Read more…

Video: Photographer Joe McNally Shoots From the Tallest Building in the World

Remember that crazy rooftopping photograph captured by photographer Joe McNally from the top of the tallest building in the world? The video above is an interesting 4.5-minute-long behind-the-scenes look at how McNally ascended the tower and held a photo shoot at the very top.
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Top Photographers Share Their Thoughts on Success and ‘Making It’

Pursuing a career doing something you love can be a terrifying thing, and so we often look to the people who have “made it” in our field as sources of inspiration. We see the work of a Heisler, Hobby or Arias, and it helps us to push through when times get tough, as they inevitably do in any pursuit.

And if, once in a while, we get the chance to hear these successful people to talk about how exactly they made it, and what it takes to be a successful photographer (or anything really), then we’ve gotten really lucky. In the video above we get exactly that, from eight of the world’s best known and most successful photographers.
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MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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The Mother of All Rooftopping Photos, On Top of the Tallest Building in the World

joemcnalleyburjkhalifa

Rooftopping photography enthusiasts enjoy climbing to locations that would make most people’s legs turn to jelly, pointing a camera straight down, and snapping a photo that commonly shows feet, a ledge, and a huge drop. While in Dubai for Gulf Photo Plus 2013, famed National Geographic photographer Joe McNally managed to snap the mother of all rooftopping photos, seen above. The Instagram snap was captured from the tip of the Burj Khalifa, the tallest manmade structure in the world.
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How National Geographic Photography Worked 20 Years Ago

Ever wonder how the photographs found on the pages of National Geographic come together? Here’s a fascinating behind-the-scenes video showing how the images of the 1992 cover story titled “The Sense Of Sight” — photographed by Joe McNally — were shot, edited, and arranged. McNally writes,

And changes. Man, is that an understatement. High res digital cameras have replaced film cameras. Hard drives store pictures, not little yellow boxes. Kodak’s stopped making carousel projectors. Photographers go to the magazine far less often, given digital transmission. Ties and jackets are seen less frequently.

But, the main mission, over time, has remained. Tell a good story in pictures. The major components–photographer, picture editor, designer, magazine editor–are all still in place, and the interplay among them is ongoing and largely unchanged.

The next time you pick up an issue of National Geographic and are tempted to flippantly flip through the images, consider these crazy facts: the 40 page/40 picture story took roughly a year to create from idea to completion and required 1200 rolls of film shot during 6 months of field work!

(via Joe McNally)

Shooting From the Pinnacle of the Empire State Building

Being a photographer for the National Geographic opens the door to all kinds of photo opportunities that other photographers would die for. For a Nat Geo story on “The Power of Light”, photographer (and now blogger) Joe McNally climbed to the very tip of the Empire State Building to capture a stunning wide angle photograph of the antenna light bulb being changed. Luckily for the rest of us, they also created an awesome behind-the-scenes video giving us a glimpse into how the photo was made.

(via f stoppers)

The Gear-Saving Reflexes of a Pro Photographer

Photographers do a lot to get the perfect shot, and sometimes even put gear safety above personal well-being in dangerous situations. Here’s a fun video photographer Joe McNally posted showing him getting knocked over by a longboarder while trying to capture a shot. Notice how he holds his position long enough to snap the pic, deftly moves his camera to his other hand when falling over, and immediately checks the photo when he gets back up. True pro.